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Canadian Navy HMCS Algonquin (DDG 283), destroyer badge (crest) Canadian Navy HMCS Algonquin (DDG 283), destroyer badge (crest)

Sable a base barry wavy of four Argent and Azure from which issues a Native Canadian's arm embowed proper wearing arm and wrist bands Argent and holding a fish-spear in bend Argent transfixing an eel Or.

Significance: The Second World War unofficial badge was of such excellence of design and appropriateness in suggesting anti-submarine activity that the design was accepted as the official badge.

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Canadian Navy HMCS Athabaskan (DDG 282), destroyer badge (crest) Canadian Navy HMCS Athabaskan (DDG 282), destroyer badge (crest)

Argent a Native American in full-feathered head-dress proper clad in buckskin breeches leggings and moccasins Or the latter beaded Azure and Gules bare to the waist except for a necklace of bear's claws Argent and shells Azure and ear ornaments of the last, mounted bareback upon a pony being halted from the trot the man holding a drawn bow with arrow Gules pointing downwards.

Significance: The badge design is based on the one planned by officers of the first of name, but was not completed before that ship was lost to enemy action. The originally planned design elements have been retained in the official badge as a tribute to those gallant officers and men who went down with their ship, fighting. The badge thus commemorates an action that ranks with the best in naval history for courage and devotion to duty.

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Canadian Navy HMCS Huron (DDG 281), destroyer badge (crest) Canadian Navy HMCS Huron (DDG 281), destroyer badge (crest)

Or nicotine bloom Gules seed pod Vert and stamens Or.

Significance: The Hurons were known as the Tobacco Indians. Hence the badge design is derived from that plant and shows the conventionalized representation of the nicotine bloom. This is in keeping with the traditional use of flower and plant forms as fighting emblems such as the Rose of York and Lancaster and our own Maple Leaf.

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Canadian Navy HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280), destroyer badge (crest) Canadian Navy HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280), destroyer badge (crest)

Or the head of an Iroquois brave couped at the base of the neck properly coloured and wearing two eagle feathers in his hair and a ring or pendant from the ear.

Significance: In 1942, the ship adopted an unofficial badge in the shape of a shield which bore the head of an Iroquois brave, with his cox-comb hair-style, ring in ear, and war paint. It was taken from a painting by the late C.W. Jeffries and, contrary to usual heraldic practice, faced the viewer's right. The design was retained in the official badge approved after the war, though with the head facing to dexter, the heraldic norm.

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