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U.S. Army Airborne


U.S. Army 18th Airborne Corps (Sky Dragons), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 18th Airborne Corps (Sky Dragons), distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of an ultramarine blue square angle up bearing the silver head and neck of a dragon issuing from base and lower right side between two elevated white wings counterwise, the tips touching above the square and issuing in base from a stylized silver motto scroll lined with ultramarine blue and inscribed “Sky Dragons” in ultramarine blue letters, the internal areas between the square and wings and the square and scroll of scarlet with upper area bearing three silver five-pointed stars, one and two.

Symbolism: The design was suggested by the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia, history and mission of the XVIII Airborne Corps. The dragon and the wings symbolize mobility, endurance, surprise and ferocity of attack by airborne units. The red areas allude to the field and skies of war, the 3 stars referring to the Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe Campaigns, World War II, in which the organization participated. The colors white and blue are used for all Corps.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 25 June 1969.

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U.S. Army 18th Airborne Corps (Sky Dragons), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 18th Airborne Corps (Sky Dragons), shoulder sleeve insignia

Issuing from the sinister side of a 2 1/4 inch (5.72 cm) white square, flat side up, a blue dragon’s head all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) blue border. (The dragon’s tongue points to dexter base corner.) Immediately above and touching the insignia a blue arc tab 11/16 inch (1.75 cm) in width, 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in length containing white letters “AIRBORNE” 5/16 inch (2.38 cm) in height.

Symbolism: The dragon’s head is representative of cunning, endurance and ferocity against enemies and is symbolic of the strategy and powerful attack of the Corps.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 18th Army Corps on 15 February 1944. It was amended to change the description and add the airborne tab on 1 May 1950. The insignia was redesignated for the XVIII Airborne Corps on 16 September 1958.

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U.S. Army Airborne Command, obsolete shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Airborne Command, obsolete shoulder sleeve insignia

On a red shield 2 3/4 inches in height, a glider and parachute in white. A black tab inscribed "AIRBORNE" in yellow letters is worn immediately above the shoulder sleeve insignia.

Symbolism: The glider and parachute represents the airborne mission of the organization.

The Airborne Command was originally established as part of the Army Ground Forces and worn that insignia with an airborne tab. The insignia for the Airborne Comand was approved on March 22, 1943; rescinded as a result of the unit being disbanded on January 15, 1946; and reinstated on April 10, 1952 for a short period for wear by certain classified units.

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U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division, combat service identification badge U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division, combat service identification badge

A gold color metal and enamel device 2 inches (5.08 cm) in height consisting of a design similar to the shoulder sleeve insignia.

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U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division, distinctive unit insignia

On and over a medium blue disc, a black demi-eagle with white head, wing details, eye and beak gold, in downward flight issuing from a white cloud in sinister base, all above a gold scroll bearing the motto "RENDEZVOUS WITH DESTINY" in black letters.

Symbolism: The design was suggested by the Division’s authorized shoulder sleeve insignia. The black eagle alluding to “Old Abe,” an actual eagle carried into combat during the Civil War by one of the regiments from the State of Wisconsin, the territory of the original 101st Division. The eagle issuing in downward flight from the cloud refers to the airborne classification of the Division. The motto, “Rendezvous With Destiny” has been the motto of the Division since its founding.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the Command and Control Battalion, 101st Airborne Division on 21 April 1958. It was redesignated for the noncolor bearing units of the 101st Airborne Division on 24 July 1968. It was redesignated for the 101st Air Cavalry Division on 5 August 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the noncolor bearing units of the 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) and amended to include a symbolism on 10 September 1968. It was amended to correct the symbolism on 8 February 2006.

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U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 101st Airborne Division, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a shield 2-1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in height overall, Sable the head of a bald eagle Proper. Attached above the insignia is a Black tab inscribed “AIRBORNE” in Yellow.

Symbolism: The design is based on one of the Civil War traditions of the State of Wisconsin, this State being the territory of the original 101st Division. The eagle alludes to “Old Abe,” the famous war eagle carried into combat during the Civil War by the 8th Wisconsin Infantry Regiment.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 101st Division on 23 May 1923. It was redesignated for the 101st Airborne Division on 28 August 1942. It was redesignated for the 101st Air Cavalry Division on 5 August 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) on 10 September 1968. It was amended to update the description and correct the symbolism on 8 February 2006.

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U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division, combat service identification badge U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division, combat service identification badge

A silver color metal and enamel device 2 inches (5.08 cm) in height consisting of a design similar to the shoulder sleeve insignia.

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U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of pair of blue stylized wings, tips down surmounted by a white fleur-de-lis supported by a blue scroll inscribed, “IN AIR, ON LAND” in silver color metal letters.

Symbolism: The fleur-de-lis is representative of the battle honors earned in France during World War I. The wings are symbolic of the Division’s mission. The motto is expressive of the personnel of the organization either on land or in the air.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 23 October 1942. It was redesignated for the Command and Control Battalion, 82d Airborne Division on 21 April 1958. It was redesignated for the noncolor bearing units of the 82d Airborne Division on 6 June 1966. The insignia was cancelled and a distinctive unit insignia of the same design as the shoulder sleeve was authorized on 31 July 1990. The original insignia was reinstated on 21 May 1998.

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U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division, shoulder sleeve insignia

Upon a red square 2 3/8 inches (6.03 cm) on a side a blue disc 1 3/4 inches (4.45 cm) in diameter with the letters AA in white. The inner elements of the two A’s vertical lines and the outer elements arcs of a circle 1 3/8 inches (3.49 cm) in diameter, elements of the letters 1/8 inch (.32 cm) in width. Attached immediately above the square is a blue tab with the word “AIRBORNE” in white.

Symbolism: The double “A” refers to the nickname “All American Division” adopted by the organization in France during World War I.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for the 82d Division by the Adjutant General, American Expeditionary Forces on 21 October 1918 and was confirmed by The Adjutant General on 8 July 1922. The insignia was redesignated for the 82d Airborne Division and an “Airborne” tab authorized on 31 August 1942. Authorization for the tab was rescinded on 29 January 1947 and subsequently restored on 23 December 1948 and announced later on 1 March 1949.

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U.S. Army 71st Airborne Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 71st Airborne Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

On a flint Indian arrow head, point down, of French horizon blue 2 1/2 inches in length by 1 3/4 inches in width an olive drab block "T" 1 3/8 inches by 1 inch, all elements 1/4 inch in width. Attached above the insignia is a blue tab inscribed "AIRBORNE" in white.

Symbolism: The 36th Division was organized with personnel from Texas and the Indian territory or Oklahoma. The arrowhead represented the Indian territory and the letter "T" represented Texas.

The shoulder sleeve insignia (without airborne tab) was originally approved on 12 November 1918 for the 36th Infantry Division. It was redesignated for the 71st Infantry Brigade on 7 May 1968 and redesignated for the 71st Airborne Brigade on 10 March 1969.

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U.S. Army 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team (Sky Soldiers), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team (Sky Soldiers), distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height overall consisting of a semi-circle divided into three sections each with concave base, the outer two sections silver and the center section of red, a vertical silver unsheathed sword point to base, the hilt resting on the red section of the semi-circle the lower edge of the guard coinciding with the concave base and the ends conjoined with the silver sections the blade between two lightning flashes points to base the points converging toward the point of the blade the flashes parallel to and enclosed by two narrow inclined silver lines starting at the diameter periphery of the semi-circle and meeting beneath the point of the sword, the area so enclosed of blue all above a stylized motto scroll, the ends simulating wings and terminating at the base of the semi-circle, bearing the inscription "SKY SOLDIERS" in blue letters; the areas between the narrow silver lines and motto scroll recessed and of silver.

Symbolism: The simulated parachute and stylized wings refer to the airborne mission of the Brigade. The unsheathed sword, point to base (implying from sky to ground) and the hilt against the red section of the parachute canopy, alludes to the combat assault jump made by the Brigade in February 1967, the first such jump made by any unit in Vietnam indicated by the "V" formed by the two lightning flashes on the V-shaped silver edged blue area. The single sword also alludes to other Brigade "firsts" such as first American ground unit in Vietnam, first in War Zones C and D and first in the Iron Triangle. The lightning flashes are also symbolic of the Brigade's striking power and surprise and rapidity of movement. The numerical designation of the Brigade can be readily simulated by various combinations of the design elements, i.e., the sword indicating one (1), the sum of the wings, the two lightning flashes and the three sections of the parachute canopy being Seven (7) and the latter by itself also being used for three (3).

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 173d Airborne Brigade on 10 August 1967. The insignia was redesignated for the 173d Airborne Brigade Combat Team with the description updated on 11 October 2006.

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U.S. Army 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team (Sky Soldiers), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team (Sky Soldiers), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a blue silhouetted right cylinder 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height and 2 inches (5.08 cm) in width overall within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) white border a vertical white wing in flight, the ulna (lower end) extended and hooked around a red bayonet. Attached above the insignia is a blue tab inscribed "AIRBORNE" in white.

Symbolism: The bayonet is used to refer to the brigade being borne by the wing alludes to the brigade's airborne status. Red, white and blue are the national colors.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 13 May 1963. It was amended to correct the dimensions on 29 July 1963. The insignia was amended to include the tab and update the description on 26 April 2000. It was redesignated for the 173d Airborne Brigade Combat Team on 11 October 2006.

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