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U.S. Cavalry


U.S. Army Cavalry, obsolete branch insignia
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U.S. Army Cavalry, obsolete branch insignia

Two crossed sabers in scabbards, cutting edge up, 11/16 inch in height, of gold color metal.

The cavalry insignia was adopted in 1851. Officers and enlisted personnel assigned to cavalry regiments, cavalry squadrons or separate cavalry troops are authorized to wear the cavalry collar insignia in lieu of their insignia of branch when approved by the MACOM commander. Some of the armor and aviation units are designated cavalry units.

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U.S. Army Cavalry, obsolete branch plaque
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U.S. Army Cavalry, obsolete branch plaque

The plaque design has the Cavalry insignia and rim in gold. The background is white and the letters are scarlet.

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U.S. Army 10th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia (left/right) U.S. Army 10th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia (left/right)

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 inch (2.54cm) blazoned: On an heraldic wreath Or and Sable, a buffalo statant Proper. On a scroll of the second fimbriated of the first the motto "READY AND FORWARD" of the like.

Symbolism: Black and gold have long been used as the regimental colors. The buffalo has likewise been the emblem of the regiment for many years having its origin in the term "Buffalo soldiers" applied by the Indians to colored regiments. The distinctive unit insignia is worn in pairs.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved on 13 Mar 1922. It was amended 6 Dec 1923 to change the wording in the description and the method of wear. On 19 Mar 1951 the insignia was redesignated for the 510th Tank Battalion. The distinctive unit insignia was redesignated for the 10th Cavalry on 12 May 1959.

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U.S. Army 12th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 12th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Or, a cactus Vert.

Crest: On a wreath Or and Vert, in front of a wreath of palm branches Proper and superimposed upon a Melanesian war club and a kampilan in saltire Gules, a sun in splendor of eight rays of the first, in chief issuant from a bar wavy Azure a Japanese torii of the fourth enclosing a horseshoe Sable nailed of the first.

Motto: SEMPER PARATUS (Always Ready).

Symbolism
Shield: The Regiment was organized at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, in 1901, and spent its first two years at that post. The cactus shows the birthplace of this Regiment, as well as its service on the Mexican border.

Crest: The palm branches represent two Distinguished Unit Streamers awarded the unit for campaigns on Leyte. The sun, adapted from the arms of the Philippines, denotes award of the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation. The kampilan, a weapon of the Moros, is for early tours of duty during the Philippine Insurrection and the war club represents service in New Guinea and the Bismarck Archipelago where the 12th Cavalry also fought. The unit's claim that one of its enlisted men was the first to enter Tokyo is noted by the horseshoe (suggesting Cavalry) within the Japanese torii, or temple gateway.

The coat of arms was approved on 14 January 1921. It was amended to change the wording in the symbolism on 28 June 1960. The coat of arms was amended to add a crest on 12 November 1965.

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U.S. Army 12th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 12th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold metal and enamel device 1 5/32 inches (2.94 cm) in height consisting of a shield blazoned: Or, a cactus Vert. Attached below and on the sides of the shield a Gray scroll inscribed "SEMPER PARATUS" in Gold.

Symbolism: This Regiment was organized at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, in 1901, and spent its first two years at that post. The cactus shows the birthplace of this Regiment, as well as its service on the Mexican border. The motto translates to "Always Ready."

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 22 October 1957.

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U.S. Army 13th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 13th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height overall consisting of two Cavalry sabers in saltire Proper, overall a sun in splendor Or charged with the numerals “13” Sable. On a scroll Or suspended from the hilts of the sabers the motto “IT SHALL BE DONE” Sable. All within a wreath of cactus on dexter side, palm on sinister side, Proper.

Symbolism: The sun in splendor is taken from the flag of South Dakota; the wreath shows the Philippine and Mexican Border service.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 13th Cavalry Regiment on 30 August 1922. It was redesignated for the 13th Armored Regiment (Light) on 6 September 1940. It was redesignated for the 13th Armored Regiment on 26 March 1942. It was redesignated for the 13th Medium Tank Battalion on 12 January 1953. The insignia was redesignated for the 13th Cavalry Regiment on 21 April 1958. It was redesignated for the 13th Armor Regiment on 31 January 1962. The insignia was redesignated for the 13th Cavalry Regiment with description updated on 23 May 2007.

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U.S. Army 14th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 14th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Or, a bend Azure between a Moro kris paleways point up Sable, and a rattlesnake coiled to strike Gules. Attached below the shield a blue scroll inscribed “SUIVEZ MOI” in Gold letters.

Symbolism: The shield is yellow for cavalry, the bend is in the color of the uniform worn at the time of the regiment’s formation (1901). The kris is for Moro campaigns and the rattlesnake for service on the Mexican border.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 14th Cavalry Regiment on 30 April 1940. It was redesignated for the 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment on 6 April 1949. It was redesignated with the description updated for the 14th Cavalry Regiment on 28 August 2000. The insignia was amended to correct the description on 7 January 2004.

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U.S. Army 158th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 158th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Or a mullet of eight points pieced Sable enfiled by two sabers in saltire Gules, on a chief paly of six Sable and Or a bend counterchanged.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Maryland Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors (Or and Sable) a cross bottony per cross quarterly Gules and Argent.

Motto: FIRST TO THE FRONT.

Symbolism
Shield: Yellow is the color traditionally associated with Cavalry. The black and yellow pattern of the chief (upper portion of the shield) is an adaptation of the Calvert Coat of Arms used on the Maryland State Flag and defines the unit as Maryland Army National Guard. The sabers and spur rowel, symbolic of Cavalry, are intermeshed to indicate strength; the points of the spur rowel denote the multifaceted abilities of a Cavalry unit.
Crest: The crest is that of the Maryland Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was approved on 4 November 1981.

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U.S. Army 158th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 158th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Or a mullet of eight points pieced Sable enfiled by two sabers in saltire Gules, on a chief paly of six Sable and Or a bend counterchanged. Attached below the shield is a Black scroll inscribed "FIRST TO THE FRONT" in Gold letters.

Symbolism: Yellow is the color traditionally associated with Cavalry. The black and yellow pattern of the chief (upper portion of the shield) is an adaptation of the Calvert Coat of Arms used on the Maryland State Flag and defines the unit as Maryland Army National Guard. The sabers and spur rowel, symbolic of Cavalry, are intermeshed to indicate strength; the points of the spur rowel denote the multifaceted abilities of a Cavalry unit.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 4 November 1981.

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U.S. Army 15th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 15th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Per fess Gules and Argent in chief a lion passant Or and in base a kris and kampilan saltirewise of the first hilted Sable.

Crest: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules a setting sun behind "the Golden Gate" all Proper.

Motto: TOUS POUR UN, UN POUR TOUS (All For One, One For All).

Symbolism
Shield: The red and white divided shield represents the old Cavalry guidon. The regiment saw good fighting in the Philippines as indicated by the crossed kris and kampilan of the Moro and Lake Lanao campaigns. In the war with Germany, the regiment was in France in the vicinity of Bordeaux and the golden lion is taken from the arms of that city. The translation of the motto "All for one, one for all" is indicative of the spirit , which has made the regiment.
Crest: The "Golden Gate" is the portico called "through the portals of the past" which is now in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco. It was one of the few things left standing after the fire of 1906 and was removed and reerected as noted. The birthplace of the regiment is indicated by the crest.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 15th Cavalry on 2 November 1921. It was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron on 10 November 1944. It was redesignated on 21 January 1948, for the 15th Constabulary Squadron. The insignia was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry on 28 November 1958. It was redesignated for the 15th Armor on 13 November 1963. The coat of arms was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry on 2 August 1968.

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U.S. Army 15th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 15th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per fess Gules and Argent in chief a lion passant Or and in base a kris and kampilan saltirewise Sable fimbriated Or. Attached below and to the left of the shield a Gold turning scroll inscribed "TOUS POUR UN" in Red letters. And attached below and to the right of the shield a Gold turning scroll inscribed "UN POUR TOUS" in Red letters.

Symbolism: The red and white divided shield represents the old Cavalry guidon. The regiment saw good fighting in the Philippines as indicated by the crossed kris and kampilan of the Moro and Lake Lanao campaigns. In the war with Germany, the regiment was in France in the vicinity of Bordeaux and the golden lion is taken from the arms of that city. The translation of the motto "All for one, one for all" is indicative of the spirit , which has made the regiment.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 15th Cavalry on 6 April 1935. It was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, Mechanized on 10 November 1944. It was redesignated on 21 January 1948, for the 15th Constabulary Squadron. The insignia was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry on 28 November 1958. It was redesignated for the 15th Armor on 13 November 1963. The distinctive unit insignia was redesignated for the 15th Cavalry on 2 August 1968. The insignia was amended to correct the description on 4 October 2002.

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U.S. Army 16th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 16th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Or a bordure Vert, on a chevron Azure 16 mullets pierced of the field; on a canton embattled (for the 6th Cavalry) Vert (for the 3d Cavalry) a staff erect attached thereto a standard flotant Or charged with a horseshoe, heels upward encircling the Arabic numeral "14" Sable (for the 14th Cavalry).

Crest: On a wreath of the colors a rattlesnake coiled to strike Proper.

Motto: STRIKE HARD.

Symbolism: The regiment was constituted in 1916 and organized with personnel from the 3d, 6th and 14th Cavalry which are shown on the canton. Green was the color of the facings of the Mounted Rifles, now the 3d Cavalry; the embattled partition line commemorates the first engagement of the 6th Cavalry when it assaulted artillery in earthworks at Williamsburg in 1862. The shield is yellow (Or), the Cavalry color; the blue chevron is for the old blue uniform, the 16 mullets (spur rowels) indicating both the numerical designation as well as mounted service. The green border and the rattlesnake crest symbolize the birth and subsequent service of the organization on the Mexican Border. The motto has a direct reference to the crest.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 16th Cavalry on 12 February 1924. It was redesignated for the 16th Cavalry Regiment (Mechanized) on 22 August 1942. It was redesignated for the 16th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, Mechanized, on 5 April 1944. The coat of arms was redesignated for the 16th Cavalry on 28 October 1958. It was amended to correct the symbolism on 23 June 1960. It was redesignated for the 16th Armor on 22 August 1968. The coat of arms was redesignated for the 16th Cavalry on 12 May 1970.

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U.S. Army 16th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 16th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Or a bordure Vert, on a chevron Azure 16 mullets pierced of the field; on a canton embattled (for the 6th Cavalry) Vert (for the 3d Cavalry) a staff erect attached thereto a standard flotant Or charged with a horseshoe, heels upward encircling the Arabic numeral "14" Sable (for the 14th Cavalry). Attached below the shield a Gold scroll inscribed "STRIKE HARD" in Black letters.

Symbolism: The regiment was constituted in 1916 and organized with personnel from the 3d, 6th and 14th Cavalry which are shown on the canton. Green was the color of the facings of the Mounted Rifles, now the 3d Cavalry; the embattled partition line commemorates the first engagement of the 6th Cavalry when it assaulted artillery in earthworks at Williamsburg in 1862. The shield is yellow (Or), the Cavalry color; the blue chevron is for the old blue uniform, the 16 mullets (spur rowels) indicating both the numerical designation as well as mounted service. The green border and the rattlesnake crest symbolize the birth and subsequent service of the organization on the Mexican Border. The motto has a direct reference to the crest.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 16th Cavalry on 28 October 1958. It was amended to correct the symbolism on 23 June 1960. It was redesignated for the 16th Armor on 22 August 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the 16th Cavalry on 12 May 1970.

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U.S. Army 172nd Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 172nd Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Per fess debased Sky Blue and Lake Blue, a fess debased Green consisting of “Mt. Mansfield” and “The Camel’s Hump” all Proper, in chief a cross couped Argent.

Crest: That for regiments and separate battalions of the Vermont Army National Guard: From a wreath Argent and Vert a buck’s head erased within a garland of pine branches all Proper.

Motto: PUT THE VERMONTERS AHEAD.

Symbolism
Shield: The shield above Mt. Mansfield and the Camel’s Hump as seen from the west across Lake Champlain, the characteristic portion of the Green Mountains, recall not only the popular name of the State but also the record of the “Green Mountain Boys” in all the wars of the country and particularly in the Revolution. The silver cross was the badge of the old “Vermont Brigade,” 2d Division, 6th Corps, one of the most famous Brigades of the Civil War and in which over one-third of all the men from Vermont served. The motto is General Sedgwick’s famous order to the 6th Corps on 1 July 1863, when it started on its 32-mile march from Manchester to Gettysburg – “Put the Vermonters ahead and keep the column closed up.”
Crest: The crest is that of the Vermont Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 172d Infantry Regiment on 2 May 1923. It was amended to change the blazon of the shield and supersede the original approval letter on 12 January 1924. It was redesignated for the 172d Armor Regiment on 20 February 1970. The insignia was redesignated for the 172d Cavalry Regiment on 10 October 2006.

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U.S. Army 172nd Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 172nd Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 9/32 inches (3.25 cm) consisting of the shield, crest and motto of the coat of arms. Shield: Per fess debased Sky Blue and Lake Blue, a fess debased Green consisting of “Mt. Mansfield” and “The Camel’s Hump” all Proper, in chief a cross couped Argent. Crest: That for regiments and separate battalions of the Vermont Army National Guard: From a wreath Argent and Vert a buck’s head erased within a garland of pine branches all Proper. Motto: PUT THE VERMONTERS AHEAD.

Symbolism: Shield: The shield above Mt. Mansfield and the Camel’s Hump as seen from the west across Lake Champlain, the characteristic portion of the Green Mountains, recall not only the popular name of the State but also the record of the “Green Mountain Boys” in all the wars of the country and particularly in the Revolution. The silver cross was the badge of the old “Vermont Brigade,” 2d Division, 6th Corps, one of the most famous Brigades of the Civil War and in which over one-third of all the men from Vermont served. The motto is General Sedgwick’s famous order to the 6th Corps on 1 July 1863, when it started on its 32-mile march from Manchester to Gettysburg – “Put the Vermonters ahead and keep the column closed up.” Crest: The crest is that of the Vermont Army National Guard.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 172d Infantry Regiment on 14 August 1923. It was amended to change the blazon of the shield and supersede the original approval letter on 12 January 1924. It was redesignated for the 172d Armor Regiment on 20 February 1970. The insignia was redesignated for the 172d Cavalry Regiment on 10 October 2006.

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U.S. Army 18th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 18th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Or, a tilting spear in bend Vert, between a horse’s head couped and a gauntlet of the like, all within a bordure of the second.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the California Army National Guard: On a wreath of the colors Or and Vert, the setting sun behind a grizzly bear passant on a grassy field all Proper.

Motto: VELOX ET MORTIFER (Swift and Deadly).

Symbolism
Shield: The shield of the coat of arms for the 111th Armored Cavalry Regiment, differenced by a green border, indicates descent of the 139th Tank Battalion from the 3d Battalion of that organization. The colors yellow and green are used for Armor. The horse’s head and lance symbolize Cavalry and medieval armor, respectively. The gauntlet represents the shock action of armor and the ability to deliver a decisive blow.
Crest: The crest is that of the California Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 139th Tank Battalion on 28 February 1956. It was redesignated for the 18th Armored Cavalry Regiment on 24 April 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the 18th Cavalry Regiment on 13 May 1975.

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U.S. Army 18th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 18th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Or, a tilting spear in bend Vert, between a horse’s head couped and a gauntlet of the like, all within a bordure of the second. Attached below the shield is a Gold scroll inscribed “VELOX ET MORTIFER” in Black letters.

Symbolism: The shield of the coat of arms for the 111th Armored Cavalry Regiment, differenced by a green border, indicates descent of the 139th Tank Battalion from the 3d Battalion of that organization. The colors yellow and green are used for Armor. The horse’s head and lance symbolize Cavalry and medieval armor, respectively. The gauntlet represents the shock action of armor and the ability to deliver a decisive blow.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 139th Tank Battalion on 28 February 1956. It was redesignated for the 18th Armored Cavalry Regiment on 24 April 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the 18th Cavalry Regiment on 13 May 1975.

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U.S. Army 1st Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 1st Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Tenné (Dragoon Yellow), a dragon passant Or. (And for informal use the escutcheon encircled with a sword belt Sable buckled at base with the belt plate of the Dragoons of 1836 Proper bearing the regimental motto in base and “FIRST CAVALRY” in chief between two eight-pointed mullets of rays one on dexter side, the other on sinister, all Or).

Crest: On a wreath of the colors, Or and Tenné (Dragoon Yellow), a hawk rising with wings addorsed and elevated Sable, langued and membered Gules.

Motto: ANIMO ET FIDE (Courageous And Faithful).

Symbolism
Shield: The color of the Dragoons was Dragoon yellow (orange-yellow), shown by the color of the shield and the dragon is in allusion to the name Dragoon. The gold eight-pointed star on the encircling belt was the insignia of the Dragoons until 1851.
Crest: This Regiment was organized in 1833 as the Regiment of United States Dragoons. Many of its officers and men came from the Battalion of Mounted Rangers which had taken part in the Black Hawk War.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 1st Cavalry Regiment on 26 January 1921. It was amended to change the wording of the blazon and add the motto on 21 November 1923. It was redesignated for the 1st Armored Regiment on 7 September 1940. It was redesignated for the 1st Constabulary Squadron on 11 June 1947. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Medium Tank Battalion on 13 August 1951. It was redesignated for the 1st Tank Battalion on 18 February 1955. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Cavalry Regiment on 21 April 1958. It was amended to change the wording of the description on 23 June 1960. It was amended to correct the wording in the blazon of the shield on 20 October 1965.

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U.S. Army 1st Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 1st Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

On a heraldic wreath Or and Tenné (Dragoon Yellow) a hawk rising with wings addorsed and elevated Sable and membered Gules—charged upon an eight-pointed Dragoon Yellow star surrounded by a Black sword belt bearing the organizational motto “ANIMO ET FIDE” with the old Dragoon belt plate of 1836. The insignia is 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in diameter.

Symbolism: This Regiment was organized in 1833 as the Regiment of United States Dragoons. Many of its officers and men came from the Battalion of Mounted Rangers which had taken part in the Black Hawk War. The color of the Dragoons was Dragoon yellow (orange-yellow) and a gold eight-pointed star on the encircling belt was the insignia of the Dragoons until 1851. The motto translates to “Courageous and Faithful.”

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 1st Cavalry Regiment on 27 November 1923. It was redesignated for the 1st Armored Regiment on 7 September 1940. It was redesignated for the 1st Constabulary Squadron on 11 June 1947. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Medium Tank Battalion on 13 August 1951. It was redesignated for the 1st Tank Battalion on 18 February 1955. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Cavalry Regiment on 21 April 1958. It was amended to change the wording of the description on 20 October 1965.

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U.S. Army 299th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 299th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Per fess wavy Argent and Azure, in chief the feather war helmet of Kamehameha the Great Gules.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Hawaii Army National Guard: From a wreath Argent and Azure a dolphin embowed hauriant Argent, in his mouth a key fesswise Or.

Motto: E MAKAALA KAKOU (Let’s Be Alert).

Symbolism
Shield: The shield is white and blue for Infantry, the original designation of the unit. The partition line suggests the ragged rough waves of the Pacific Ocean. The feather war helmet is a distinctive Hawaiian charge.
Crest: The crest is that of the Hawaii Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 299th Infantry Regiment, Hawaii National Guard on 4 May 1936. It was redesignated retroactive to 1 September 2007, for the 299th Cavalry Regiment with the symbolism updated.

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U.S. Army 299th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 299th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per fess wavy Argent and Azure, in chief the feather war helmet of Kamehameha the Great Gules. Attached at each side and below a tripartite dark blue scroll inscribed “E” on dexter segment “MAKAALA” on center segment and “KAKOU” on sinister segment in Silver letters.

Symbolism: The shield is white and blue for Infantry, the original designation of the unit. The partition line suggests the ragged rough waves of the Pacific Ocean. The feather war helmet is a distinctive Hawaiian charge. The motto translates to “Let’s Be Alert.”

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 299th Infantry Regiment on 4 May 1936. It was amended to correct the blazon on 7 December 1967. The insignia was redesignated retroactive to 1 September 2007, with the description and symbolism updated for the 299th Cavalry Regiment.

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U.S. Army 2nd Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 2nd Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A metal and enamel device one inch (2.54 cm) in height consisting of a gold eight pointed star of rays surmounted by a green palmetto leaf charged with a silver color fleur-de-lis, on a green ribbon scroll forming the base of the device, the regimental motto “Toujours Prêt” in gold metal letters.

Symbolism: The eight-pointed star insignia worn by dragoons, the 2d Cavalry having been originally formed as the Second Regiment of Dragoons in 1836. The palmetto leaf represents the Regiment’s first action against the Seminole Indians in Florida, where the palmetto leaf grows in abundance. The fleur-de-lis is for combat service in France in both World War I and World War II. The motto "Toujours Prêt” (Always Ready) expresses the spirit and élan of the Regiment.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 2d Cavalry Regiment on 16 January 1923. The insignia was amended to change the 6 pointed star to a 8 pointed star to conform to the old dragoon star on 28 April 1924. On the 23 March 1931, it was amended to prescribe the method of wear. It was redesignated for the 2d Constabulary Squadron on 21 January 1948. The insignia was redesignated for the 2d Armored Cavalry Regiment (US Constabulary) on 17 March 1949. It was redesignated for the 2d Armored Cavalry Regiment on 1 September 1955. The distinctive unit insignia was amended to change the description on 20 August 1965. It was redesignated effective 16 April 2005, for the 2d Cavalry Regiment.

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U.S. Army 2nd Cavalry Regiment, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 2nd Cavalry Regiment, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a black disc within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) yellow border 2 3/4 inches (6.99 cm) in diameter overall, a yellow octagonal with concave sides a green scalloped circle bearing a white fleur-de-lis all above a green motto scroll bearing the inscription “Toujours Prêt” in yellow letters.

Symbolism: The design of the shoulder sleeve insignia is based on the Regiment’s distinctive insignia, badge type, approved 28 April 1924. The yellow octagonal simulates the eight pointed star insignia worn by dragoons, the 2d Cavalry having been originally formed as the Second Regiment of Dragoons in 1836. The green scalloped circle, simulating a palmetto leaf, represents the Regiment’s first action against the Seminole Indians in Florida, where the palmetto leaf grows in abundance. The fleur-de-lis is for combat service in France in both World War I and World War II. The motto "Toujours Prêt” (Always Ready) expresses the spirit and élan of the Regiment.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 2d Armored Cavalry Regiment on 23 June 1967. It was amended to change the symbolism on 9 October 1967. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 April 2005, with the description updated, for the 2d Cavalry Regiment.

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U.S. Army 316th Cavalry Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 316th Cavalry Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A yellow shield-shaped device 3 1/2 inches (8.89 cm) in height and 3 inches (7.62 cm) in width overall bearing a smaller shield separated scarlet above and white below by a gold lightning flash, from top right to bottom left, surmounted by a yellow sheathed cavalry saber bendwise hilt to base, all within an orle of eight black mullets, the whole device edged by a black 1/8 inch (.32 cm) border.

Symbolism: The shield shape of the device symbolizes defense and protection of the United States. The color black and the eight stars represent the Eighth Tank Destroyer Group from which the unit was formed. The lightning flash denotes speed, mobility, and effectiveness, the characteristics of the combined forces with which the Brigade cooperates. The saber refers to Cavalry missions and operations. Scarlet and white represent Cavalry; gold (yellow) denote excellence.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 14 November 2008.

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U.S. Army 316th Cavalry Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 316th Cavalry Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in width overall consisting of an octagonal rectangle divided from top right to bottom left by a gold lightning flash, a panther’s head delineated in gold on scarlet above the flash, two gold cavalry sabers saltirewise on white below it; attached below the device a black semi-circular motto scroll inscribed “PERDITOR-ORIS” in gold letters.

Symbolism: Scarlet and white represent Cavalry. Black recalls World War II associations with the Eighth Tank Destroyer Group from which the unit was formed. The panther refers also to this Group, one of whose symbols was the panther. The lightning flash denotes mobility and effectiveness, the characteristics of the combined forces with which the Brigade cooperates. The eight-sided field recalls again the Eighth Tank Destroyer Group. The sabers are traditionally associated with Cavalry actions. Gold signifies excellence. The motto translates to “Destroyer.”

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 14 November 2008.

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U.S. Army 4th Cavalry Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 4th Cavalry Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a black star superimposed by two crossed sabers hilts up below a gold ancient oil lamp enflamed red and the star attached below a black scroll inscribed "TRAIN FOR COMBAT" in gold letters.

Symbolism: Gold/yellow is the color traditionally associated with the Cavalry units. Red symbolizes valor and sacrifice; gold denotes excellence. The star, indicating achievement, highlight the unit's five campaign participation credits World War II. The crossed sabers reflect teamwork and underscore the heritage of the Cavalry.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 25 Feb 1998.

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U.S. Army 4th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
Vector image of U.S. Army 4th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army 4th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Or, on a pale embattled Azure pierced by a saber Gules a cannon reversed of the field and thereon a saber and a bayonet saltirewise and an arrow palewise all points down of the third.

Crest: On a wreath Or and Azure a cratered mount Vert bearing a saber bendwise Or and in the crater a kris reversed Gules.

Motto: PARATUS ET FIDELIS (Prepared and Loyal).

Symbolism
Shield: The shield is yellow for Cavalry. The attack on the intrenchments at Selma is symbolized by the embattled blue pale and red bayonet. The capture of Hood’s Artillery is shown by the reversed cannon. The rout of the enemy’s Cavalry at Murfreesboro by the reversed saber and the successful Indian campaigns by the reversed arrow.
Crest: The Bud Dajo campaign is indicated by the conventionalized volcano of the crest and the defeat of the Moros by the reversed kris in the crater. The crest contains the regiment’s triumphant saber at the charge.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 4th Cavalry Regiment on 9 February 1922. It was amended to correct the blazon of the shield on 27 April 1926. The insignia was redesignated for the 4th Reconnaissance Battalion on 11 December 1950. It was redesignated for the 4th Armored Cavalry Reconnaissance Battalion on 30 June 1955. The insignia was rescinded on 24 May 1956. It was reinstated and approved for the 4th Cavalry Regiment on 30 August 1957.

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U.S. Army 4th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 4th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold metal and enamel device 1 5/16 inches (3.33 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Or, on a pale embattled Azure pierced by a saber Gules a cannon reversed of the field and thereon a saber and a bayonet saltirewise and an arrow palewise all points down of the third.

Symbolism: The shield is yellow for Cavalry. The attack on the intrenchments at Selma is symbolized by the embattled blue pale and red bayonet. The capture of Hood’s Artillery is shown by the reversed cannon. The rout of the enemy’s Cavalry at Murfreesboro by the reversed saber and the successful Indian campaigns by the reversed arrow. The shield contains the regiment’s triumphant saber at the charge.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 4th Cavalry Regiment on 6 November 1922. It was amended to change the method of wear on 12 December 1923. It was again amended to correct the description on 27 April 1926. The insignia was redesignated for the 4th Reconnaissance Battalion on 11 December 1950. It was redesignated for the 4th Armored Cavalry Reconnaissance Battalion on 30 June 1955. The insignia was rescinded on 24 May 1956. It was reinstated and approved for the 4th Cavalry Regiment on 30 August 1957.

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U.S. Army 5th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
Vector image of U.S. Army 5th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army 5th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Or a cross moline Sable, on a chief embattled of the last a maltese cross Argent.

Crest: On a wreath of the colors (Or and Sable) a bundle of five arrows Sable armed and flitted Gules, tied with a rattlesnake skin having five rattles Proper.

Motto: LOYALTY AND COURAGE.

Symbolism
Shield: The shield is yellow for Cavalry. The cross moline symbolizes the charge of this Regiment on Longstreet's troops at Gaines Mills in 1862; a charge which saved the Union artillery and which is characterized by the Regimental historian as "its most distinguished service." The cross moline is supposed to represent the iron pieces of a mill stone (moulin, the French word Mill). The chief is for the Puerto Rican Expedition of 1898. The original name of the island was San Juan, named for the old knights of St. John who wore a white maltese cross on a black habit. The partition line is embattled to suggest the castle on the Spanish arms.
Crest: The crest is for the Indian campaigns of the Regiment; the number of arrows corresponds to the numerical designation of the organization.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 5th Cavalry on 11 June 1921. It was redesignated for the 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) on 16 December 1953. The insignia was redesignated for the 5th Cavalry on 10 July 1959. It was amended to revise the symbolism on 23 June 1960.

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U.S. Army 5th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 5th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 7/32 inches (3.10 cm) in height consisting of a coat of arms blazoned as follows: Shield: Or a cross moline Sable, on a chief embattled of the last a Maltese cross Argent. Crest: On a wreath of the colors (Or and Sable) a bundle of five arrows Sable armed and flighted Gules, tied with a rattlesnake skin having five rattles Proper; the device enclosed within a motto scroll arcing over the top of the shield and inscribed "Loyalty" on the dexter side and "Courage" to sinister in Black letters.

Symbolism: The shield is yellow for Cavalry. The cross moline symbolizes the charged of this Regiment on Longstreet's troops at Gaines Mills in 1862; a charge which saved the Union artillery and which is characterized by the Regimental historian as "its most distinguished service." The cross moline is supposed to represent the iron pieces of a mill stone (moulin, the French word Mill). The chief is for the Puerto Rican Expedition of 1898. The original name of the island was San Juan, named for the old knights of St. John who wore a white maltese cross on a black habit. The partition line is embattled to suggest the castle on the Spanish arms. The crest is for the Indian campaigns of the Regiment; the number of arrows corresponds to the numerical designation of the organization.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 5th Cavalry on 19 January 1923. It was redesignated for the 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) on 16 December 1953. The insignia was redesignated for the 5th Cavalry on 10 July 1959. It was amended to revise the symbolism on 23 June 1960.

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U.S. Army 73rd Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
Vector image of U.S. Army 73rd Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army 73rd Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Per fess Azure and Gules, on a fess Or a hand in armor grasping a bolt of lightning, both Vert.

Crest: On a wreath of the colors Or and Azure, issuing from a flame of six tongues, three to dexter and three to sinister, charged with an arrowhead Argent within a crescent Vert, the head of a mace formed by a Korean Taeguk.

Motto: HONOR, FIEDLITY, COURAGE.

Symbolism
Shield: The shield is divided red and blue per fess, with a fess of gold thereon, which are the three colors of the shoulder sleeve insignia of the armored tank forces. The lightning bolt is symbolical of the striking power of the organization.

Crest: The six tongues of the flames represent the unit’s six decorations. The crescent and arrowhead symbolize the Algeria-French Morocco and southern France assaults, World War II, and the colors red and green are used to represent the French Croix de Guerre awarded for the Italian campaigns. The mace in the arms of Colmar suggested the mace head to refer to that campaign. The Taeguk represents the Korean War and the three Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations from that nation. The mace also alludes to the striking power of armor.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 756th Tank Battalion, Light on 15 May 1942. It was redesignated for the 756th Tank Battalion on 22 November 1943. The insignia was redesignated for the 73d Tank Battalion on 23 October 1953. It was redesignated for the 73d Armor on 19 March 1963. It was amended to add the crest on 15 December 1965. It was redesignated effective 25 February 2004, for the 73d Cavalry Regiment.

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U.S. Army 73rd Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 73rd Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall, consisting of a shield blazoned: Per fess Azure and Gules, on a fess Or a hand in armor grasping a bolt of lightning, both Vert. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “HONOR, FIDELITY, COURAGE” in Red.

Symbolism: The shield is divided red and blue per fess, with a fess of gold thereon, which are the three colors of the shoulder sleeve insignia of the armored tank forces. The lightning bolt is symbolical of the striking power of the organization.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 756th Tank Battalion, Light on 15 May 1942. It was redesignated for the 756th Tank Battalion on 22 November 1943. The insignia was redesignated for the 73d Tank Battalion on 12 October 1953. It was redesignated for the 73d Armor on 19 March 1963. It was redesignated effective 25 February 2004, for the 73d Cavalry Regiment.

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U.S. Army 8th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms
Vector image of U.S. Army 8th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army 8th Cavalry Regiment, coat of arms

Shield: Azure on a fess Or eight mullets pierced of the field, a demi-horse rampant issuant Argent.

Crest: On a wreath of the colors Or and Azure a grizzly bear passant Sable.

Motto: HONOR AND COURAGE.

Symbolism: The eight mullets show the regimental number and Cavalry tradition ascribing the origin of the pierced mullet to the rowel of a spur. This is further indicated by the horse. The bear is the emblem of California, where the regiment was organized in 1866.

The coat of arms was approved on 29 January 1921. It was amended to correct the symbolism on 10 January 1927.

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U.S. Army 8th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia (left/right) U.S. Army 8th Cavalry Regiment, distinctive unit insignia (left/right)

A demi-horse issuant rampant Argent from a band fessways Or charged with eight mullets Azure pierced of the second, surmounting a ribbon scroll Sable with the regimental motto "HONOR AND COURAGE" of the second.

Symbolism: The eight mullets show the regimental number and Cavalry tradition ascribing the origin of the pierced mullet to the rowel of a spur. This is further indicated by the horse.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 10 January 1927. It was amended on 10 January 1967, to correct the description.

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