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U.S. Civil Affairs Corps


U.S. Army Civil Affairs, branch insignia
Vector image of U.S. Army Civil Affairs, branch insignia / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army Civil Affairs, branch insignia

On a globe 5/8 inch in diameter, a torch of liberty 1-inch in height surmounted by a scroll and a sword crossed in saltire, all of gold color.

In 1955, The Civil Affairs and Military Government Branch, USAR, was established. On 30 April 1956, the Office of Civil Affairs and Military Government gave concurrence in the design (gold global background with gold torch, sword and scroll superimposed thereon). The Department of the Army General Staff approved the design on 1 June 1956. The branch was redesignated to Civil Affairs USAR on 2 October 1959. The globe indicates the worldwide areas of Civil Affairs operations. The torch is from the Statue of Liberty, a symbol associated with the spirit of the United States. It also represents the enlightened performance of duty. The scroll and sword depict the civil and military aspects of the organization's mission. The insignia was authorized for wear by all personnel assigned to Regular Army Civil Affairs TOE units on 13 October 1961.

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U.S. Army Civil Affairs, branch plaque
Vector image of U.S. Army Civil Affairs, branch plaque / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army Civil Affairs, branch plaque

The plaque design has the branch insignia, letters, and border in white and the background is purple.

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U.S. Army Civil Affairs, regimental coat of arms
Vector image of U.S. Army Civil Affairs, regimental coat of arms / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army Civil Affairs, regimental coat of arms

The coat of arms appears on the breast of a displayed eagle on the regimental flag. The coat of arms is: Purpure, a scroll and sword saltirewise, and overall a torch palewise Or; a bordure Argent. Crest: On a wreath of the colors (Or and Purpure) a globe Celeste gridlined Argent superimposed by a dexter gauntlet Proper holding a balance scale Or. The regimental flag has a purple background and white fringe.

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U.S. Army Civil Affairs, regimental insignia
Vector image of U.S. Army Civil Affairs, regimental insignia / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army Civil Affairs, regimental insignia

A silver and gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches in height consisting of a shield, crest and motto. The insignia is blazoned as follows: Purpure, a scroll and sword saltirewise, and overall a torch palewise or; a bordure argent. Attached below the shield, a silver scroll inscribed "SECURE THE VICTORY" in black letters. The crest above the shield: On a wreath of the colors (Or and Purpure), a globe Celeste gridlined Argent superimposed by a dexter gauntlet argent holding a balance scale Or. The Regimental Insignia was approved on 14 April 1989.

Purple and white are the colors traditionally associated with Civil Affairs. Gold is emblematic of honor and achievement. The scroll, sword and torch are adapted from the Civil Affairs branch insignia and denote the branch-wide scope and application of the design. The scroll and sword depict the civil and military aspects of the organization. The torch refers to the Statue of Liberty, a symbol associated with the spirit of democracy of the United States. The border emphasizes unity, continuity and the whole regimental concept. Crest: The scales represent balance and normality; the gauntlet denotes the military's role in establishing, administering and protecting the equilibrium. The globe signifies the extensive scope of the mission of the Civil Affairs Regiment.

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U.S. Army Civil Affairs & Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) (USACAPOC(A)), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Civil Affairs & Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) (USACAPOC(A)), distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in width overall consisting of a diagonally crossed silver sword and fasces superimposed by a sphere divided vertically white and black and gridlined silver and interlaced with a tripartite red scroll inscribed "BY SWORD DEED AND WORD" in base in silver letters, overall a silver chess knight detailed black and inscribed on its base with a black nebuly line.

Symbolism: The chess knight typifies the capabilities of the Command, implying both overt and covert missions. It is inscribed on base with a nebuly line, the traditional heraldic symbol for clouds, indicating the unit's airborne capabilities. The globe is divided black and white to represent the unit's ability to deploy and operate worldwide night and day, as well as reflecting the multifaceted nature of the unit's mission as a combat force and a peacekeeping presence. The sword, chess knight and fasces suggest the three major components of the Command's mission: Special Operations, Psychological Operations and Civil Affairs functions. Silver connotes eminence and red signifies actions and valor.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved effective 1 December 1990, for the US Army Reserve Special Operations Command. It was redesignated for the US Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command with the symbolism revised on 19 December 1990.

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U.S. Army Civil Affairs & Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) (USACAPOC(A)), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Civil Affairs & Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) (USACAPOC(A)), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a green shield with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) green border, 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in width and 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height overall, a yellow flash above a purple flash both bend sinisterwise, superimposed by a gold sword with silver gray blade. To be worn with the black and yellow Airborne tab.

Symbolism: The sword represents the military nature and strength of the Command. The flashes suggest speed and electronic communications. The colors of the insignia reflect the units within the Command. Purple is traditionally associated with Civil Affairs and dark green with Psychological Operations and Special Forces. The color gold (yellow) denotes excellence.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the US Army Reserve Special Operations Command on 16 January 1990. It was amended to change the color of the border on 2 March 1990. It was amended to change the color of the subdued border on 30 April 1990. The insignia was redesignated for the US Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command on 19 December 1990.

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U.S. Army European Civil Affairs Division, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army European Civil Affairs Division, shoulder sleeve insignia

A shield 2 1/2 inches wide and 3 inches high composed of five vertical stripes, the outer stripes red, 1/2 inch wide, the next stripes on each side white 3/8 inch wide, and the center stripe blue 5/8 inchwide; on the blue stripe a sword hilt to base with white blade and yellow hilt; all within a 1/8 inch blue border.

Symbolism: Red, white and blue are out national colors. The shape of the insignia and the sword were symbolic of the SHAEF insignia.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on October 23, 1944.

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U.S. Army 304th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 304th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 304th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 304th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

U.S. Army 308th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 308th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 308th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 308th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

U.S. Army 321st Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 321st Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 321st Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 321st Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

U.S. Army 322nd Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 322nd Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 322nd Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 322nd Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

U.S. Army 354th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 354th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 354th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 354th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

U.S. Army 358th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 358th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 358th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 358th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

U.S. Army 360th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 360th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 360th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 360th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

U.S. Army 361st Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 361st Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 361st Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 361st Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

U.S. Army 364th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 364th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 364th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 364th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

U.S. Army 95th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 95th Civil Affairs Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

U.S. Army 95th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 95th Civil Affairs Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

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