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14th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia
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14th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a red acorn 1 5/8 inches (4.13cm) across, 1 3/4 inches (4.45cm) in length standing in its cup 2 1/8 inches (5.40cm) across and 1 inch (2.54cm) in length a white letter "A" 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in width and 2 inches (5.08cm) in height.

Symbolism: The acorn is a symbol of strength and the letter "A" is the initial letter of its organization. The colors are those of the Army distinguishing flag.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 Jul 1944.

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15th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia
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15th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia

Within a 1/8 inch (.32cm) olive drab border a pentagon 1 13/16 inches (4.60cm) on a side, divided per saltire and charged with the letter "A" 1 7/8 inches (4.76cm) in height, all counterchanged red and white.

Symbolism: The insignia is in the colors of an army. The division per saltire and the five sides of the pentagon are suggestive of the numerical designation of the organization while the letter "A" indicates that the organization is an army.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 26 Oct 1944.

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1st U.S. Army, distinctive unit insignia
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1st U.S. Army, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches in height overall consisting of a black enamel capital letter "A" bearing three gold stars on the top cross bar and five gold on the center cross bar, in front of and interlaced with a gold fleur-de-lis. The vertical petal is charged in base with a red enamel arrowhead behind and extending above the letter "A" and the tops of the two outside or flanking petals above the cross bar extending over the vertical legs of the letter "A". The lower ends of the outside petals curve under and over the lower ends of the vertical legs of the letter "A" and are joined together by a gold arched scroll inscribed "First In Deed" in black enamel letters. The areas within the letter "A" above the center cross bar are white enamel and the areas below the cross bar are red enamel.

Symbolism: The basic design was suggested by the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia of the First Army. The Interlaced fleur-de-lis represent wartime service in France and alludes to the initial organization of the Headquarters Company as the Headquarters Troop, First Army at La Ferte-sous-Jouarre, France 10 August 1918. The three stars at the top of the letter "A" are for Lorraine 1918, St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne campaigns in which the First Army participated in World War I. The five stars on the center cross bar are for the Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe campaigns in which the First Army participated in World War II, the red arrowhead referring to the assault landing on the Normandy beaches. The motto "First In Deed" is based on the numerical designation, purpose and achievements of the First United States Army.

The insignia was approved on 27January 1969.

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1st U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia
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1st U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a background equally divided horizontally white and red, 3 1/4 inches in height and 2 1/2 inches in width at base and 2 1/8 inches in width at top, a black block letter "A", 2 3/4 inches in height, 2 inches in width at base and 1 5/8 inches in width at top, all members 7/16 inch wide, all enclosed within a 1/8 inch Army Green border.

Symbolism: The red and white of the background are the colors used in flags for Armies. The letter "A" represents "Army" and is also the first letter of the alphabet suggesting "First Army."

A black letter "A" was approved as the authorized insignia by the Commanding General, American Expedition Force, on November 16, 1918 and approved by the War Department on May 27, 1922. The background was added on November 17, 1950.

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4th U.S. Army, distinctive unit insignia
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4th U.S. Army, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02cm) in height overall consisting of a red enamel square one angle up bearing a white enamel four-leaf clover with stem to base in front of and extending over a blue (ultramarine) enamel disc, between at top and in base arced gold motto scrolls, that at top crossing over the square in front of the angle, curving downward and terminating at the upper sides of the square, and that in base crossing over the square in front of the angle and terminating at the lower sides of the square, the scroll at the top inscribed "Leadership" and that in base "And Integrity" all in red enamel letters.

Symbolism: The design was suggested by the shoulder sleeve insignia of the Fourth U. S. Army modified by the white four-leaf clover with stem being placed in front of and over a blue disc which alludes to the waters of the Pacific and Pacific Coast and the bluebonnet, the State flower of Texas.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally authorized on 16 Jan 1969. It was amended on 25 Sep 1969 to correct the symbolism of the design.

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4th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia
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4th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a red square 2 inches (5.08cm) on a side, a white four-leaf clover with stem, 1 3/8 inches (3.49cm) across leaves, stem to bottom - the square to be worn point up.

Symbolism: The composition of this design alludes to the numerical designation of the organization and the colors are those associated with "armies."

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Fourth Army on 26 January 1927. The insignia was redesignated for Fourth United States Army on 4 October 1957.

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6th U.S. Army, distinctive unit insignia
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6th U.S. Army, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a white six-pointed star (formed by two equilateral triangles) one point up from which issues 12 rays, 6 of gold alternating with 6 of red forming in silhouette another six-pointed star (with no two sides parallel), two points up, the pointed rays larger and of gold, the upper and lower two each bearing a blue five-pointed star, the points of the white six-pointed star resting and centered on the red rays all above a gold convex motto scroll, the ends terminating at and conjoined with the vertical sides of the two lower points of the six-pointed star formed by the gold and red rays, inscribed “BORN OF WAR” in red, the area between the bottom of the star and the top of the scroll pierced.

Symbolism: The white six-pointed star with the points on red was suggested by the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia for the unit. The overall shape of the gold rays issuing from the white star was suggested by the sun device on the Philippine flag and together with the red rays suggestive of Japan forms another six-pointed star and refers to the entire Pacific Theater, World War II for which the Sixth US Army was awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation, alluded to by the red rays, the color of the Meritorious Unit Commendation streamer. The four blue stars refer to New Guinea, Bismarck Archipelago, Leyte and Luzon campaigns in which the Sixth US Army participated, the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation awarded it for service 17 October 1944 to 4 July 1945 being alluded to by the gold rays of the Philippine sun. All elements of the design which simulate a shell burst and allude to the motto “Born of War,” involve the numerical designation of “six”—two six-pointed stars, one consisting of six gold and six red rays, and six stars (two six-pointed and four five-pointed).

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for Sixth United States Army on 6 September 1968.

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6th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia
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6th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a six pointed white star 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in diameter with a red border 3/32 inch (.24 cm) wide and 3/32 inch (.24 cm) in from the edge, a red letter “A” 7/8 inch (2.22 cm) high, all on a 2 3/4 inch (6.99 cm) Army Green disc.

Symbolism: The six pointed star is significant of the number “six” and the red letter “A” signifies “Army.” The red and white colors are the colors of the design approved for distinguishing flags for the numbered Armies.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Sixth Army on 26 January 1927. The original design was cancelled and a new design approved on 10 January 1945. It was amended to change the background color from olive drab to Army Green on 6 December 1960.

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7th U.S. Army (Europe), former distinctive unit  insignia 7th U.S. Army (Europe), former distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02cm) in width overall consisting of blue enamel isosceles triangle with a vertical stylized red enamel arrow fimbriated gold issuing from base all in front of and extending over the top and sides of a gold crescent, the area within the horns of red enamel, the blue triangle bearing the gold letter “A” as depicted on the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia of the Seventh Army, the cross bar of the letter “A” joined by a gold vertical bar of the same width to the inner rim of the crescent, the red areas on each side of the vertical gold bar being slightly narrower in width, the base of the crescent bearing six five-pointed stars of blue enamel and contained within a concentric blue enamel scroll with the inscription “Pyramid of Power” in gold letters, the ends of the scroll terminating at and conjoined with the base of the triangle at its extremities.

Symbolism: The design is based on the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia of the Seventh Army. The crescent alludes to the initial activation of the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Seventh Army, in North Africa 10 July 1943: the bar connecting it with the “A” indicating the subsequent movement of the Army from organization and training in Africa to combat in Europe, the six stars referring to the Sicily, Rome-Arno, Southern France, Rhineland, Central Europe and Ardennes-Alsace campaigns in which the Seventh Army participated, the arrow alluding to the assault landing in Southern France and the progressive advance through Europe beginning with the Sicily campaign. The elements of the design have been arranged to denote this advance and to illustrate the motto “Pyramid of Power.”

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 28 October 1968.

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7th U.S. Army (Europe), former shoulder sleeve insignia 7th U.S. Army (Europe), former shoulder sleeve insignia

On a blue right angle triangular background, the hypotenuse to base, a seven stepped letter “A” (steps 1/4 inch (.64 cm)) in yellow with the center in scarlet, horizontal element 1/4 inch (.64 cm) in width. The overall dimensions are 1 15/16 inches (4.92 cm) in height and 3 3/4 inches (9.53 cm) in width.

Symbolism: The colors blue, yellow, and red allude to the three basic arms. The pyramidal figure is of a distinctive form with the symbolic letter “A” representing the first letter of the “Army” while the number of steps on each side are self explanatory.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved on 23 June 1943. It was amended to change the dimensions on 17 March 2008.

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8th U.S. Army, distinctive unit insignia
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8th U.S. Army, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches in height overall consisting of a rectangular shield divided per fess argent and red arched at top and bottom superimposed by the organizational shoulder sleeve insignia (on a red octagon a white cross pattee throughout saltirewise). All above a silver motto scroll doubled and lined scarlet and inscribed "PACIFIC VICTORS" in scarlet letters.

Symbolism: The basic design was suggested by the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia for the Eighth United States Army. The shield is divided horizontally white and scarlet in the same pattern as the flags for United States Armies. The motto "Pacific Victors" alludes to the Eighth Army's campaigns and operations in the Pacific Area, and service during World War II and the Korean War.

The insignia was approved on 2 Oct 69.

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8th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia
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8th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a red octagon 2 1/4 inches in width and height with each side 1 inch in length, a white cross pattee throughout saltirewise with rounded corners, all within a 1/8 inch red border. The overall dimensions are 2 3/8 inches in width and height.

Symbolism: Red and white are the colors used to distinguish the flags of Armies. The white cross pattee divides the octagon into eight areas representing the numerical designation of the Army.

The insignia was approved on 10 May 1944.

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9th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia
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9th U.S. Army, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a red nonagon whose points lie on an imaginary circle 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in diameter, a white letter "A" within the outline of a rosette figure of four petals, all white.

Symbolism: Red and white are the colors associated with armies. The nine-sided figure indicates the numerical designation of the organization.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 21 September 1944.

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U.S. Army Central (3rd U.S. Army), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Central (3rd U.S. Army), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a blue disc with a red border, the blue area bearing throughout a white capital letter “A” (as depicted on the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia for US Army Central) in front of in base a gold stylized fleur-de-lis, the center petal of the fleur-de-lis extending behind and above the cross bar of the letter “A” and behind and below the red border and the tops of the two outer petals extending under, downward and over the red border and terminating at and conjoined with the feet of the letter “A” and the lower ends extending behind and below the red border which bears at top five gold five-pointed stars and the inscription “TERTIA SEMPER PRIMA” in gold letters, the word “TERTIA” in base and between the outer petals of the fleur-de-lis and the stars, the word “SEMPER” on the left and the word “PRIMA” on the right.

Symbolism: The design is based on the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia of US Army Central (formerly United States Third Army). The fleur-de-lis in base alludes to the initial activation of the Headquarters, Third Army, at Ligny-en-Barrois, France, 15 November 1918. The five stars refer to the five campaigns Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe, World War II in which the Third United States Army participated. The motto reflects the Third Army’s constant readiness.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for Third United States Army on 10 October 1968. It was redesignated for US Army Central with the description updated and symbolism revised on 29 August 2006.

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U.S. Army Central (3rd U.S. Army), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Central (3rd U.S. Army), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a blue disc 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in diameter a white letter “A” with members 1/8 inch (.32 cm) wide within a red circle 2 inches (5.08 cm) in diameter and 3/16 inch (.48 cm) in width.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for Third Army on 20 December 1922. It was redesignated for Third United States Army on 10 November 1960. The insignia was redesignated for US Army Central on 29 August 2006.

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U.S. Army Forces Korea, emblem
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U.S. Army Forces Korea, emblem

The emblem was prepared and approved by the Commander, U.S. Forces, Korea on 6 May 1993.

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U.S. Army Japan, distinctive unit insignia
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U.S. Army Japan, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height overall consisting of an octagon with two opposite angles vertical containing a stylized representation of Mount Fujiyama in light blue with a white peak silhouetted against a red demi-sun on a blue background all enclosed by a circular gold scroll of five segments, bearing in the upper three segments the words "OMNIA FIERI POTEST" in blue letters.

Symbolism: The unit's location in Japan is symbolized by the representation of Mount Fujiyama, a world famous symbol of that country. The octagon denotes the eight directions of the compass and is symbolic of peace and security.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 13 February 1975.

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U.S. Army Japan, shoulder sleeve insignia
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U.S. Army Japan, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a medium blue disk within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border with a 1/32 inch (.08 cm) white piping an inner edge, 2 inches (5.08 cm) in diameter overall, a representation of Fujiyama in light blue and white.

Symbolism: The unit's location in Japan is symbolized by the representation of Mount Fujiyama, a world famous symbol of that country.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Army Forces, Far East Command on 5 September 1952. It was amended to change the name to United States Army Forces, Far East on 25 February 1953. The insignia was rescinded effective 1 July 1957. The shoulder sleeve insignia was reinstated and redesignated for the United States Army, Japan on 3 April 1959.

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U.S. Army North (5th U.S. Army), distinctive unit  insignia U.S. Army North (5th U.S. Army), distinctive unit insignia

A device of silver color metal and enamel 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height overall consisting of a silver Florentine fleur-de-lis garnished with red buds and placed over the center of it a blue mosque tower with two silver stars on its base, two blue stars flanking its dome and a single blue star centered below it making a total of five stars positioned in the form of a “V”.

Symbolism: The blue mosque is adapted from the US Army North shoulder sleeve insignia (formerly Fifth Army) and refers to the initial activation of the Headquarters, Fifth Army, in Morocco, North Africa, 5 January 1943. The Florentine style fleur-de-lis denotes service in Italy and the five stars the number of campaigns to the Fifth Army’s credit. The “V” form alludes to the unit’s numerical designation.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for Fifth United States Army on 31 October 1968. It was redesignated for United States Army North with the description and symbolism updated on 19 December 2006.

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U.S. Army North (5th U.S. Army), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army North (5th U.S. Army), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a red rectangular background with top corners chamfered at 45° having a 2 1/2 inch (6.35 cm) base, 2 3/4 inches (6.99 cm) in height and top 1 3/8 inches (3.49 cm), a silhouette of a mosque in blue charged with a white letter “A” 1 9/16 inches (3.97 cm) in height, members 3/16 inch (.48 cm) in width above a white number “5”, 11/16 inch (1.75 cm) in height, members 1/8 inch (.32 cm) in width.

Symbolism: The flag colors of red, white, and blue are self-explanatory. The outlined figure of the mosque is symbolic of the country in which Fifth Army, the previous designation of the unit, was originally activated. The letter “A” indicates “Army”, and conforms in general, to designs used by the First and Third United States Armies.

The shoulder sleeve insignia originally approved for Fifth Army on 26 January 1927, was pentagon shaped with a white background and five red stars formed in a pentagon shape. The current design was originally approved for Fifth Army on 7 April 1943. It was redesignated for the Fifth United States Army effective 1 January 1957. The insignia was redesignated for United States Army North with the description and symbolism updated on 19 December 2006.

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U.S. Army Pacific, distinctive unit insignia
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U.S. Army Pacific, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches in height overall, consisting of a disc dived horizontally with six wavy alternating blue and silver bars, surmounted diagonally by a stylized red arrow, point up, bearing a silver diamond, and along the edge of the disc below the arrow and from base to tip of the arrow, a silver palm frond.

Symbolism: Red, white and blue are used to refer to both our national colors and the organization's shoulder sleeve insignia. The disc with its wavy blue and silver (white) bars is symbolic of water and represents the Pacific and its divisions of land and sea areas with which the United States Army Pacific is concerned. The arrow of war, suggested by the unit's shoulder sleeve insignia, relates to the overall mission. The diamond on the arrowhead alludes to "Diamond Head" and refers to the island of Oahu, Hawaii, the unit's home site. The palm denotes merit and leadership and also refers to the foliage of the Pacific areas.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for US Army Pacific on 26 Feb 69; rescinded on 20 Jan 75; reinstated and authorized for US Army Western Command effective 23 Mar 79; and redesignated for US Army Pacific effective 22 Aug 90.

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U.S. Army Pacific, shoulder sleeve insignia
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U.S. Army Pacific, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a blue disc 2 3/4 inches in diameter, a red arrow fimbriated white, pointing upward bendwise at a 30 degree angle between the star polaris, the seven stars of Ursa Major, and the four stars of the Southern Cross, all white.

Symbolism: The arrow is representative of the strength and valor of the Armed Forces of the United States while the location of the Pacific Ocean Areas is indicated by Polaris, the seven star of Ursa Major, and the constellation of the Southern Cross.

The insignia was originally approved for the United States Army Forces, Pacific Ocean Areas on 18 Oct 44; redesignated for United States Army Forces Middle Pacific on 8 Sep 45; redesignated for United States Army Forces, Pacific Ocean Areas on 1 Nov 45; redesignated for United States Army Pacific on 4 Dec 47; redesignated United States Army Western Command effective 23 Mar 79; and redesignated for the United States Army, Pacific effective 22 Aug 90.

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U.S. Army South, distinctive unit insignia
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U.S. Army South, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height consisting of a rectangle arced at top and bottom divided saltirewise gold and red and bearing a stylized blue "S"; overall a white Spanish galleon charged on the upper fore-topsail with a red cross formy, all enclosed at the bottom by a gold scroll inscribed "DEFENSE AND FRATERNITY" in black.

Symbolism: The Spanish galleon and the colors red and gold are historically associated with the Caribbean and the command's theater of operations. The stylized "S" underscores the designation of the command, "South," while suggesting the two bodies of water -- the Atlantic (Caribbean) and the Pacific-- connected by the Panama Canal, with the red areas representing Central and South America.

The insignia was originally approved for the U.S. army Forces Southern Command on 24 June 1969. It was reassigned for U.S. Army South on 1 April 1987. The insignia was amended to change the description and symbolism on 29 July 1996.

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U.S. Army South, shoulder sleeve insignia
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U.S. Army South, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a 2 1/2 inch (6.35 cm) ultramarine blue disc, a white galleon with a red cross on the sail, riding on white wave lines with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) ultramarine blue border. The overall dimension is 2 3/4 inches (6.99 cm) in diameter.

Symbolism: The galleon is symbolic of the Caribbean area. This type of ship is usually associated with the Caribbean area since it predominated during the Spanish regime. The blue background represents the color of the Caribbean Sea. The cross was the insignia of Columbus, the first explorer to land in the Caribbean area.

The insignia was originally approved for the Caribbean Defense Command on 3 May 1944. It was redesignated for the United States Army, Caribbean on 2 February 1948. The insignia was redesignated for the United States Army Forces Southern Command on 11 July 1963. It was reassigned for the United States Army South with the description amended on 1 April 1987. The insignia was amended to correct the description and symbolism on 28 July 2009.

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U.S. Army Vietnam, former shoulder sleeve insignia
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U.S. Army Vietnam, former shoulder sleeve insignia

A shield 3 inches (7.62cm) in height and 2 inches (5.08cm) in width overall; within a 1/8 inch (.32cm) white border three vertical stripes yellow, blue and red, on the center blue stripe a sword pointing upward, blade white and handle yellow.

Symbolism: Yellow and red are the colors of Vietnam. The blue center represents the United States, together with the sword it alludes to the U.S. Military in Vietnam.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 10 Feb 1966.

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U.S. Army Berlin, shoulder sleeve insignia
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U.S. Army Berlin, shoulder sleeve insignia

A dark blue Norman shield with curved top 4 inches (10.16cm) in height and 2 1/2 inches (6.35cm) in width overall within a 1/8 inch (.32cm) dark blue border, palewise a double handed flaming sword 2 1/8 inches (5.40cm) in length, hilt golden yellow, white blade, red flame, all below an arched chief 1/4 inch (.64cm) sky blue, and a rainbow of five colors 5/16 inch (.79cm) overall: Red orange, yellow, green and dark blue in descending order; at the top on a dark blue arc edged red 5/8 inch (1.59cm) in height the inscription "BERLIN" in yellow letters 3/8 inch (.95cm) in height.

Symbolism: The shoulder sleeve insignia is that of the U.S. Army, Europe insignia with the addition of the "Berlin" tab.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Berlin Command on 12 Oct 1960. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army, Berlin on 13 Oct 1970.

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U.S. Army Philippine Battalion, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Philippine Battalion, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a yellow disk 3 1/4 inches in diameter with a 1/8 inch edge, a conventionalized black volcano emitting smoke, the volcano charged with three yellow mullets in fess.

Symbolism: The volcano represents the area in which the units were located. The three stars are taken from the Philippines Coat of Arms which represents the principle islands - Luzon and Mindanao, and the Visayan Islands.

The insignia was requested for the lst Philippine Battalion; however the unit was changed to the lst Philippine Regiment. The authorization approved on August 6, 1942, was for all Philippine Battalions.

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