Military Insignia & Badges
WEB Gallery of military badges, crests, flags and patch designs
« Home
USA USA flag

U.S. Frigates


U.S. Navy USS Antrim (FFG-20), frigate emblem (crest, decommissioned) U.S. Navy USS Antrim (FFG-20), frigate emblem (crest, decommissioned)

SHIELD: Celeste, a cross throughout or voided Azure (Dark Blue) and overall a mullet point down of the second bearing a fouled anchor palewise entwined with two cross crosslets fitched in saltire all of the third.

CREST: On a wreath of the colors, Or and Celeste, within a wreath formed by a frond of palm and a branch of laurel Proper in front of a demi-torch of the first a portcullis Gules chained and studded Or.

MOTTO: On a scroll Azure doubled Celeste the words “IN DEFENSE OF FREEDOM” in Gold letters.

SEAL: The complete coat of arms in full color as in the blazon upon a white oblong, arched at the top and bottom and enclosed by a blue border inscribed “USS ANTRIM” at top and “FFG-20” in gold letters; the blue border bearing an outer edge of gold continuous rope.

Symbolism
SHIELD: Dark blue and gold are the colors traditionally associated with the Navy and symbolize the sea and excellence. The light blue and reversed star refers to the Medal of Honor awarded to Admiral Antrim for heroic actions while in a Japanese POW camp at Makassar, Celebes, and Batavia, Java. The anchor symbolizes his Naval career and the cross crosslets fitched, a personal device, his dedication to service. The cross throughout the shield is an allusion of the Navy, Cross awarded for action in the Battle of the Java Sea in the Dutch East Indies.
CREST: The wreath is for outstanding gallantry and achievement; the palm denotes victory and the laurel honor. The torch symbolizes leadership and bravery, and the portcullis, the POW camp where these qualities earned Admiral Antrim the Navy Medal of Honor.

/ TIOH

U.S. Navy USS Aubrey Fitch (FFG 34), frigate emblem (crest, decommissioned) U.S. Navy USS Aubrey Fitch (FFG 34), frigate emblem (crest, decommissioned)

SHIELD: Per fess nebuly Celeste and Azure, in chief four mullets Or and on a pole reversed of the like a caltrop of the second surmounting a ray issuant from base Gules fimbriated of the field.

CREST: Upon a wreath Or and Azure, standing upon waves of the sea Proper a trident, winged at the head and fitched at the foot of the first, surmounted on the shaft by an open book Proper leathered of the second and garnished of the first bearing on the dexter page a four-bladed propeller and on the sinister a cross patonce saltirewise all Gold.

MOTTO: On a scroll Azure doubled Or, the words “A BREED APART” in Gold.

SEAL: The coat of arms emblazoned upon a white oval field enclosed by a dark blue border edged on the outside with gold rope and inscribed “USS AUBREY FITCH” at the top and “FFG 34” in base gold.

Symbolism
SHIELD: The blue colors suggest the sky and the sea in allusion to naval aviation. The stars refer to the highest rank achieved by Admiral Aubrey Fitch. The yellow (or gold)area in base refers to a phase of the Battle of the Coral Sea in which Admiral Fitch the first American Air Admiral to engage the Japanese in the first decisive naval battle in history to be fought entirely by aircraft, without a shot being exchanged by surface ships. This action was decisive in that it halted the enemy’s southern conquest; therefore it is symbolized by a weapon of ancient times which was strewn on the ground to halt the advance of cavalry. The symbol also refers to the other events in the Admiral’s distinguished career: he once commanded the USS Langley, the first American aircraft carrier when the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor he took Carrier Division One from the West Coast of the United States and penetrated deep into the enemy waters.
CREST: The shape of the waves was suggested by the design of the Distinguished Service Medal which was awarded twice to Admiral Fitch during his career. The winged trident and open book refer to his appointment as the first naval airman as superintendent of the Naval Academy and the propeller is placed on the book to denote he was instrumental in the establishment of the Department of Aeronautics during his administration. The propeller also refers to the Army Distinguished Flying Cross awarded to Admiral Fitch. The gold cross patonce represents the appointment as Honorary Knight in the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, one of the many foreign decorations with which Admiral Fitch was honored.

/ TIOH

U.S. Navy USS Estocin (FFG-20), frigate emblem (crest, decommissioned) U.S. Navy USS Estocin (FFG-20), frigate emblem (crest, decommissioned)

The Coat of Arms of USS ESTOCIN is a lasting symbol of the ship's namesake, Captain Michael J. Estocin, a Naval Aviator, and one of Vietnam War heroes.

Three red piles on the shield signify the three plane groups he was leading during a strike against fortified North Vietnamese positions on April 26, 1967. Despite his plane being severly damaged by missile fire, Captain Estocin re-entered the target area and continued to relentlessly prosecute his own missile attack in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire. The reversed five point star symbolizes the Medal of Honor he was posthumously awarded for his conspicious gallantry in combat. Courage, Honor, and Tenacity were Captain Estocin's hallmarks and have become the ship's motto. The falcon, a fierce hunter, and bird which always returns to the one who releases it, alludes to his courageous airmanship and now eternal tie to USS TICONDEROGA (CV 14), represented by the steel gauntlet.

/ USN

U.S. Navy USS Taylor (FFG 50), frigate emblem (crest)
Vector image of U.S. Navy USS Taylor (FFG 50), frigate emblem (crest) / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Navy USS Taylor (FFG 50), frigate emblem (crest)

SHIELD: Azure, a chevron rompu argent between in chief two mullets or and in base a sea lion erect gules bearing a trident of the third.

CREST: On a wreath of the colors, argent and azure, in front of a pair of wings displayed azure with at base a lightning flash gules, two naval swords, an officer’s and an enlisted man’s crossed proper, points down, and between their hilts a cross pattee convex or.

MOTTO: On a scroll azure doubled argent the words “PROUD DEFENDER” in letters argent.

Symbolism
SHIELD: The blue shield represents the Navy. The chevron is a reference to Commander Taylor’s naval career, comprised of three periods of service - - World War II service, his training and service in peacetime, and his final duties in the Vietnam combat zone.
The two gold stars allude to the Air Medal awarded twice to the Commander and to two earlier ships which bore the name TAYLOR. The sea lion refers to his courage and dedication to duty and is holding a gold trident in reference to his zeal in upholding the honor and traditions of the Navy and the nation.
The use of scarlet, blue and gold on the shield refers to the Navy Presidential Unit Citation awarded the carrier USS HORNET at the time Commander Taylor saw action from its decks as a member of the crew of Bombing Squadron Eleven.
CREST: The wings represent Commander Taylor’s service as a naval aviator. The scarlet lightning flash refers to his training as a Radioman and his service with the Fleet All Weather Training Unit and also refers to his attacks on enemy gun sites during the rescue attempt which cost him his life. The gold cross represents the Navy Cross awarded him posthumously for his heroism. The crossed swords represent Commander Taylor and the downed pilot he attempted to save, both lost while in combat with the enemy.
SEAL: The coat of arms emblazoned upon a white oval enclosed within a blue collar edged on the outer side with gold rope and inscribed with the words “USS TAYLOR” at the top and “FFG 50” in base in gold letters.

/ TIOH

U.S. Navy USS Thach (FFG 43), frigate emblem (crest)
Vector image of U.S. Navy USS Thach (FFG 43), frigate emblem (crest) / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Navy USS Thach (FFG 43), frigate emblem (crest)

SHIELD: Azure two chevronels couched fretted Argent interlaced with an anchor palewise Or, on a chief enarched nebuly of the last a trident head issuant from chief points to base Gules.

CREST: On a wreath, Or and Azure, a pair of wings conjoined in leure of the first charged with a cross convex pattee of the like fimbriated of the second and encircled by a wreath vert.

MOTTO: On a scroll Azure doubled Or, the inscription “READY AND ABLE” in Gold letters.

SEAL: The complete coat of arms in full color as in the blazon upon a white oval enclosed by a dark blue border with an outer edge of gold rope and inscribed “USS THACH” at top and “FFG 43” in base all in gold letters.

Symbolism
SHIELD: Dark blue and gold are the colors traditionally associated with the Navy and represent the sea and excellence. The enarched nebuly chief refers to the sky and naval aviation; the three tines of the red trident representing “Fighting Three” and Admiral Thach’s aggressive leadership of that squadron for which he was highly decorated. The interlaced chevronels and anchor emphasize the importance of naval air to the fleet and symbolize the “Thach Weave”, a fighter tactic developed by and named for Admiral John Smith Thach.
CREST: The wreath is adapted from and refers to the Navy Distinguished Service Medal. The cross and its fimbriation symbolize the Navy Cross and a second award of that medal. The gold wings refer to naval aviation.

/ TIOH

U.S. Navy USS Vandegrift (FFG-48), frigate emblem (crest) U.S. Navy USS Vandegrift (FFG-48), frigate emblem (crest)

The ship's decorations include the Meritorious Unit Citation, National Defense Service Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal; Southwest Asia Service Medal, and five Sea Service Ribbons.

Shield: On a field of gold and blue, the colors traditionally associated with the Navy, a scarlet demi-lion symbolizing the Marine courage and strength holds a blue lozenge, emblem of the 1st Marine Division, which fought under General Vandegrift's command against the Japanese at Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands. The four gold sectors of the shield represent the continents where General Vandegrift served during the greater part of his outstanding career, North and South America, Asia and Australia. The blue sectors represent the oceans and the Navy, also alluded to by the wavy diagonals.

Crest: General Vandegrift's medals and decorations are represented in the crest: the Medal of Honor, the Navy Cross and the distinguished Service Medal, the last referred to by the blue around the cross. The five bronze stars awarded to the General are recalled by the points of the Medal of Honor, and his distinction as the first active-duty Marine officer to reach four-star rank is symbolized by the four stars surrounding the crest. The adversary, Japan, against which General Vandegrift distinguished himself in combat, is alluded to by the red roundle at the center of the crest. The color red and the gold demi-globe also represent the Marine Corps. The laurel wreath symbolizes the many other awards and decorations General Vandegrift earned throughout his career, as well as his academic achievements and degrees.

/ USN

© CivicHeraldry.com 2008-2017