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U.S. Army Medical Department


U.S. Army Medical Corps, branch insignia
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U.S. Army Medical Corps, branch insignia

A gold color medal caduceus, 1 inch in height. (With the exception of the Medical Corps, each Corps is identified by black enamel letters centered on the caduceus indicative of their Corps.) The insignia for Medical Service Corps is silver.

In 1851 "a caduceus embroidered in yellow silk on a half chevron of emerald green silk" was worn by Hospital Stewards of the Medical Department. The caduceus in its present form was approved in 1902. Rooted in mythology, the caduceus, historically an emblem of physicians symbolizes knowledge, wisdom, promptness, and various aspects of medical skill.

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U.S. Army Medical Corps, branch plaque
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U.S. Army Medical Corps, branch plaque

The plaque design has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold except the Medical Service Corps is silver. The background is maroon.

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U.S. Army Medical Corps, regimental coat of arms
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U.S. Army Medical Corps, regimental coat of arms

The coat of arms is displayed on the breast of a displayed eagle on the regimental flag. The coat of arms is: Per pale: to dexter, paly of thirteen Gules and Argent, on a chief Azure twenty mullets in four rows of five each of the second; to sinister, Argent, a staff entwined with a serpent Vert. The crest (On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules, a cross below an arc of seven mullets all within a wreath of laurel, all Argent) is displayed above the eagle's head. The background color of the flag is maroon and the fringe is white. The coat of arms was approved on 17 April 1986.

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U.S. Army Medical Corps, regimental colours (flag)
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U.S. Army Medical Corps, regimental colours (flag)

U.S. Army Medical Corps, regimental insignia
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U.S. Army Medical Corps, regimental insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 inch in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned as follows: Per pale: to dexter, paly of thirteen Gules and Argent, on a chief Azure 20 mullets in four rows of five each of the Second; to sinister, Argent, a staff entwined with a serpent Vert; attached below the shield a blue scroll inscribed "TO CONSERVE FIGHTING STRENGTH" in silver. The insignia was originally approved on 17 April 1986 but the size was changed from 1 1/4 inch to 1 inch on 28 August 1986.

Symbolism of Regimental Insignia: The design of the shield is based on the shield of a historical heraldic device probably first used in 1818 by the Army Medical Department. The white stars on a blue background and the red and white stripes represents the United States flag of 1818. The green staff entwined with the serpent, originating in mythology, is symbolic of medicine and healing. Green was the color associated with the Corps during the last half of the nineteenth century. Symbology of the crest of the coat of arms: The colors Argent and Gules are those associated with the Army Medical Department. The cross and the wreath are adapted from devices authorized for hospital stewards and other enlisted men when the Hospital Corps was established in 1887. The seven stars emphasize the elements of the organization: Medical Corps, Army Nurse Corps, Dental Corps, Veterinary Corps, Medical Service Corps, Army Specialist Corps, and the Enlisted Medical Specialist. The motto "TO CONSERVE FIGHTING STRENGTH" reflects the medical mission.

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U.S. Army Dental Command, distinctive unit insignia
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U.S. Army Dental Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height consisting of a maroon hexagon bearing a white crenelated triangle charged with a gold rod of Aesculapius, all enclosed in base by a green laurel wreath superimposed by a gold scroll inscribed "GLOBAL CARE" in maroon.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors traditionally used by the Dental Corps. Gold represents the precious metals used by dentists. The hexagon represents the six Army imperatives: quality people, training, leader development, force mix, doctrine and modernization. The triangle suggests the Greek letter "delta," a symbol of dentistry. Its white color alludes to the absence of disease and the dental profession's focus on prevention and infectious disease control. The triangle is embattled to symbolize the U.S. Army Dental Command's mission to ensure a ready force. The rod of Aesculapius is a symbol of healing and medicine; the laurel wreath underscores the command's quality of care, dental readiness and education programs.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 6 Sep 1996

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U.S. Army Dental Corps, branch insignia
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U.S. Army Dental Corps, branch insignia

U.S. Army Dental Corps, branch plaque
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U.S. Army Dental Corps, branch plaque

U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches in height overall consisting of a green enamel pear-shaped scroll bearing in gold letters on the lower half the words "RESPONSIVE AND DEDICATED" and containing a maroon enamel Greek cross surmounted by a gold lamp enflamed with red enamel, and issuant out of each of the four angles a white enamel pointed ray enclosed at either side by a gold serpent with heads at top facing inward and tails entwined behind the center of the cross and curving down at either side.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors used for the Army Medical Department. Green was the color first used in the medieval age for academic gowns for medicine and is currently the academic color for medicine. In 1847, green was prescribed as the first Army Medical Department color. The cross is a traditional symbol for medical aid and assistance, and the lamp represents dedication and service. The white rays together with the arms of the cross relate to the points of the compass alluding to the broad scope of the Medical Command. The serpents, suggested by the branch insignia of the Army Medical Department, are symbolic of wisdom, prudence, renewal, and convalescence.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the US Army Health Services Command on 26 Jan 73 and redesignated for the US Army Medical Command on 30 Jun 94 to be effective 2 Oct 94.

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U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a maroon oval 2 1/4 inches in width and 3 inches in height overall, a sword with hilt at the top and hand guard in the form of a pair of stylized wings, and below two serpents with heads facing center and bodies entwined about the blade all in white and all within an 1/8 inch white border.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors used for the Army Medical Department. The wings and serpents allude to the caduceus symbol representing all medical services, and the sword in place of the staff relates to the United States Army. The sword with point to base is symbolic of sacrifice and mercy, and alludes to the noncombatant role of the medical services.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the US Army Health Services Command on 31 Jan 73 and redesignated for US Army Medical Command on 30 Jun 94 to be effective 2 Oct 94. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-556).

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U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (MRMC), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (MRMC), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a maroon hexagon, one point up, bearing on the two vertical sides a white curved segment on each side of a gold vertical flaming torch entwined with two gold serpents facing the flame, all in front of gold rays radiant from the hexagon and enclosed by a maroon scroll arched and touching the hexagon at the top inscribed "PROTECT," folded in back of the hexagon at the sides, and on a curve touching the base point inscribed "PROJECT-SUSTAIN," all letters gold.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors used for the Army Medical Department. The entwined serpents are suggested by the Army Medical Corps branch insignia and are associated with the art of medical healing. The flaming torch serving as the support refers to the guiding light of research and knowledge developed by the Command. The hexagon represents the symbols used in chemical formulas for structure of matter. The white spherical segments together with the emanating rays represent the worldwide mission to provide facilities and materials for medical activities.

Background: The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command on 4 Feb 1972. The insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command on 17 Nov 1994. On 21 Mar 1996 the insignia was amended to change the motto.

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U.S. Army Medical Service Corps, branch insignia
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U.S. Army Medical Service Corps, branch insignia

U.S. Army Medical Service Corps, branch plaque
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U.S. Army Medical Service Corps, branch plaque

U.S. Army Medical Specialist Corps, branch insignia
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U.S. Army Medical Specialist Corps, branch insignia

U.S. Army Medical Specialist Corps, branch plaque
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U.S. Army Medical Specialist Corps, branch plaque

U.S. Army Nurse Corps, branch insignia
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U.S. Army Nurse Corps, branch insignia

U.S. Army Nurse Corps, branch plaque
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U.S. Army Nurse Corps, branch plaque

U.S. Army Reserve Medical Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Reserve Medical Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a gold cross superimposed by gold wreath of oak and laurel encircling a bust of a Minute Man wearing a tricorn hat, overall across the bottom, three maroon scrolls stacked bend-sinister wise doubled and inscribed with “CIVIS” “MILITIS” “MEDICUS” in gold.

Symbolism: The Minute Man is adapted from the Army Reserve plaque and highlights the Army Reserve Medical Command being a direct reporting command to Headquarters, United States Army Reserve Command. The Minute Man has also traditionally been used to represent our citizen soldiers and recalls that heritage. Gold is emblematic of honor and excellence. Maroon is the Medical Corps’ primary color. The cross and motto also highlight the Command’s mission. The branch of oak represents strength and growth and the laurel, high achievement.

The distinctive unit insignia is approved effective 1 October 2005.

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U.S. Army Reserve Medical Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Reserve Medical Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

A white shield with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) yellow border 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in width and 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height overall bearing a maroon cross throughout, thereon between two black stars edged yellow a light green serpent entwined around a white rod.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors traditionally used by the Medical Corps. The cross and rod of Aesculapius, symbols of healing and medicine, symbolize the organization’s medical mission. The two stars represent the training of medical individuals and medical units. The black stars edged gold recall the Army logo and military preparedness.

The shoulder sleeve insignia is approved effective 1 October 2005.

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U.S. Army Veterinary Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Veterinary Command, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18cm) in height overall consisting of a shield and crest blazoned: Shield: Sanguine, a torch Argent inflamed Proper entwined by two serpents of the second langued Or. Crest: From a wreath Argent and Sanguine a demi-unicorn rampant Argent armed Or. Attached below the shield a gold color scroll inscribed "KNOWLEDGE-INTEGRITY" in black.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Medical department. The torch, symbolic of learning, is entwined by serpents which represent health-giving virtues. The unicorn, a fabulous creature whose horn possessed the power of purification, denotes the hygienic function of the organization.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the Meat and Dairy Hygiene School on 15 Jul 1953. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Medical Service Veterinary School on 20 Jul 1962. On 24 Jun 1968 the insignia was amended to add the crest and motto. The distinctive unit insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army Medical Department Veterinary School on 21 Mar 1969. On 31 Jan 1975 it was cancelled. As an exception to policy the insignia was reinstated for wear by personnel assigned to non-color bearing units of the U.S. Army Medical Department Veterinary Services on 9 Feb 1983. As a result of the organization of the U.S. Army Veterinary Command, the insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army Veterinary Command and all non-color bearing veterinary units on 2 Oct 1994.

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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, branch insignia
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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, branch insignia

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, branch plaque
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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, branch plaque

U.S. Army 175th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 175th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a maroon Greek cross charged with a white disc bearing a gold star, all above a gold grizzly bear standing on four feet in base in front of a light green field and a gold setting sun, the top rays of the sun terminating in back of the cross; all enclosed by a triple-arched maroon scroll inscribed “COMMAND” on the left side and base, “GUIDANCE” on the top, and “CONTROL” on the right side and base, all letters gold.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors used for the Army Medical Department. The grizzly bear and setting sun are suggested by the crest for the California Army National Guard. The gold star refers to the unit’s location at Sacramento, the capital of California. Additionally, the sun and star, symbols of command, guidance, and control, allude to the organization’s motto. The cross, an emblem of aid and assistance, signifies the medical mission of the unit.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 175th Medical Group on 1 February 1972. It was redesignated for the 175th Medical Brigade on 4 March 1976.

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U.S. Army 175th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 175th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a maroon square 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) on each side overall, one angle up, a yellow stylized sunburst bearing a scarlet Greek cross charged with a narrow white Greek cross, all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) white border.

Symbolism: The Greek cross is a symbol of aid and assistance. The stylized sunburst represents the present location of the organization at Sacramento, California, referred to as the “Golden City” and the “Golden State.” The sun rays are symbolic of healing and good health. White is a color used to represent ability and wisdom. The color scarlet symbolizes courage and dedication, while maroon and white are colors used for the Army Medical Department.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 4 June 1976.

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U.S. Army 1st Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 1st Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A maroon shield bearing within a wreath of silver oak leaves the helmet of an esquire charged with the shoulder sleeve insignia of the First Division, a shield with the figure "1." All above a silver scroll bearing the inscription "FORTITUDE AND COMPASSION" in black letters.

Symbolism: Maroon and white (silver) are the colors used by the Army Medical Service. The red numeral "1" on an olive drab shield is the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 1st Division as authorized 31 October 1918, and with which the unit served in World War I. The helmet indicates the military character of the organization.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 1st Medical Regiment on 19 Dec 1923. It was redesignated and amended to include the motto for the 1st Medical Group on 20 Mar 1968. On 26 Apr 1968 it was amended to correct the symbolism. The insignia was redesignated on 6 Jun 2000 for the 1st Medical Brigade.

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U.S. Army 1st Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 1st Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white rectangle arced at top and bottom with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) yellow border, 2 inches (5.08cm) in width and 3 inches (7.62cm) in height overall, a maroon cross throughout bearing a yellow rod entwined by a green snake with a red eye.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors used by Army Medical Department units; gold is for excellence. The staff of Aesculapius and the maroon cross symbolize the medical arts and allude to the mission of the brigade.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved 6 Jun May 2000.

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U.S. Army 213th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 213th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

On a white shield arced at top, 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in width overall within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) maroon border, a maroon Greek cross and blue trident interlaced.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors used for the Army Medical Department. The cross, a symbol for aid and assistance, alludes to the basic mission of the organization. The blue trident, attribute of Neptune, “Father of Waters” refers to the Mississippi River and to the State of Mississippi, present home area of the Brigade.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 6 September 1975.

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U.S. Army 213th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 213th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a maroon cross terminating at the top in a trident, surmounted by a silver serpent the tail entwining the vertical bar of the cross, and upon a silver scroll arched at the top of the inscription “SERVICE” and enveloping the base “PEACE OR WAR” in black letters.

Symbolism: Maroon and white (silver) are the colors used for the Army Medical Department. The unit’s medical mission is represented by the serpent, an ancient symbol for healing and the cross which alludes to the red cross emblematic of aid in distress. The trident at the top, suggested by the crest of the Mississippi Army National Guard, refers to the Mississippi River.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 213th Medical Battalion on 9 October 1967. It was redesignated for the 213th Medical Group on 16 May 1972. The insignia was redesignated for the 213th Medical Brigade on 13 May 1975.

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U.S. Army 2nd Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 2nd Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in width overall, consisting of an inverted gold fleam on a red enamel cross with equal length arms rounded at the ends surmounting the junction of two gold swords saltirewise all centered on a white enamel disc which is surrounded by a continuous maroon scroll folded inward at wither side issuing gold rays from the upper arch behind the swordpoint; the scroll folded three times in base and crossing in front of the swords above the hilt and bearing in gold letters "CENTER OF MERCY" on the left center and right hand respectively.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are colors traditionally associated with the Medical Department. The fleam, an ancient medical scalpel, resembles the numeral two and is centered on a red cross, a traditional symbol for medical services, and represents the unit's primary mission. The crossed swords allude to the soldier and to the two components supported by the unit. The white disc refers to hope. The sun rays refer to a setting sun alluding to the western United States where the unit is located.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 2d Hospital Center on 31 Aug 1979. It was redesignated for the 2d Medical Brigade, with description and symbolism revised, on 20 Oct 1992.

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U.S. Army 2nd Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 2nd Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white disc with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) gold border 2 1/4 inches (5.72cm) in diameter overall, a maroon cross with the arms rounded at the ends bearing an inverted gold fleam.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Medical Corps. The cross alludes to medical care and service while the inverted fleam, an ancient surgical implement, simulates the numeral "2," representing the unit's numerical designation. Gold is for honor and excellence.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 20 Oct 1992.

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U.S. Army 32nd Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 32nd Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A Silver color metal and enamel insignia 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Sanguine bendwise a torch Argent flaming Or entwined with a snake Vert. Attached below the shield a Silver scroll inscribed "CONSERVAMUS PERSONIS" in Black letters.

Symbolism: The shield is maroon, the first named color of the Medical Department. The torch represents knowledge entwined by the green serpent, taken from the staff of Aesculapius, the Father of Medicine. The motto translates to "We Conserve the Personnel."

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 32d Medical Battalion on 13 January 1941. It was redesignated for the 132d Medical Battalion on 20 August 1992. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 October 2002, with description and symbolism updated for the 32d Medical Brigade.

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U.S. Army 32nd Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 32nd Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white diamond-shape, all sides equal within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) maroon border, 3 1/2 inches (8.89 cm) in height overall bearing a maroon couped cross surmounted by a yellow torch superimposed by a white star.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors traditionally used by the Medical units. The diamond shape of the insignia signifies courage and energy of the cadre, to educate and direct the troops in the field of Health Sciences. The couped cross, universal symbol for medical care, denotes the brigade's focus on medical service. The torch refers to guidance and knowledge, and the brigade's mission of training the troops. The star symbolizes Texas, the largest state in the Continental United States and location of the 32d Medical Brigade.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 9 October 2002. It was amended to correct the symbolism on 23 October 2002.

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U.S. Army 426th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 426th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a stylized gold caltrop upon a green equilateral triangle with, in base, a gold fleur-de-lis upon a red cross, and traversing the triangle a white wavy bar, all within a circular maroon scroll debruised by the top of the triangle and bearing the motto “READINESS WITH MERCY” in gold.

Symbolism: World War II action in Central Europe is represented by the green triangle which refers to the mountains of the Ardennes as well as the tents used by the predecessor organization for medical services and support during hostilities. The wavy white band represents the Rhineland, the Rhine River, and the winter snows of the region. France is represented by the fleur-de-lis. The gold caltrop, in the triangular form of the beechnut, symbolizes land war in Europe and recalls the beech forests of Ardennes-Alsace.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 426th Medical Group on 8 November 1985. It was redesignated for the 426th Medical Brigade with the description and symbolism revised effective 16 September 1993.

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U.S. Army 426th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 426th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a rectangle arced at the top and bottom with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) gold border 2 inches (5.08 cm) in width and 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height overall, divided horizontally blue above green, a gold disc bearing a maroon triangle surmounted by a white cross.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Medical Corps; gold denotes excellence. The disc symbolizes mobility and quick response, and the triangle suggests the mountain state of Utah. The cross highlights medical care and compassion. The blue and green represent sky and grass and suggest life and the “Great Lifegiver.”

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 3 August 1994.

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U.S. Army 5th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 5th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a white disc charged with a scarlet saltire above a scarlet mound and centered overall a maroon cross with three crenellations on its upper arm, all within a circular maroon scroll with forked ends bearing at top the words “LEADERSHIP AND SERVICE” in gold, and issuant from each end toward center base a sprig of gold laurel leaves; overall a gold torch with flame centered upon the cross and handle between the leaves at center base.

Symbolism: The hometown and state of the unit are represented by four elements; namely, the scarlet saltire from the state flag of Alabama, the mound at the base of the cross which refers to Red Mountain where Birmingham is located, the flames of industry which light the skies of the city by night, and the encircling scroll representing a magic circle recalling the name, “Magic City,” as Birmingham is sometimes described. The torch represents the leadership emphasized in the motto and its five flames the name, the numerical designation. The maroon cross representing medical service is embattled with three merlons which symbolize the World War II campaigns in which the unit participated, and the laurel leaves in base connote distinguished service.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 5th medical Group on 24 November 1982. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2011, for the 5th Medical Brigade and amended to update the description and symbolism.

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U.S. Army 5th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 5th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

A white rectangle with rounded corners 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height and 2 inches (5.08 cm) in width overall bearing a red saltire (Saint Andrew’s Cross), bordered in maroon. Emitting from base is a red triangle with a narrow maroon border. Centered on the saltire a maroon cross with three crenellations on its upper arm bearing a sword with a serpent coiled around it, all white; all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) maroon border.

Symbolism: The crenellated cross symbolizes medical strength and defense. The red saltire (Cross of Saint Andrew) refers to the State flag of Alabama, the unit’s home area and is a traditional symbol of independence and defiance against tyranny. The red triangle alludes to the iron rich Red Mountain, under whose shadow he unit resides. The reference to the Staff of Aesculapius alludes to its attribute of the Roman god of medicine and healing.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2011.

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U.S. Army 804th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 804th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02cm) in height overall consisting of a disc divided horizontally white and maroon bearing two green serpents entwined with their heads extending at the top, the disc bearing overall at center a red cross charged with a gold lamp of knowledge; and atop the cross between the serpents' heads a six-pointed gold star; around the base of the disc the inscription "TO YOUR HEALTH" in gold letters.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors used for the Army Medical Department. A red cross is emblematic of aid and assistance. The disc, base of the design, connotes unity. The serpents, lamp and star allude to the caduceus and the mission with the color green alluding to the ancient academic gowns of medicine. The lamp indicates enlightenment and the star represents the six New England states comprising the unit's command.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 804th Hospital Center on 14 Dec 1979. It was redesignated for the 804th Medical Brigade on 8 Apr 1999.

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U.S. Army 804th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 804th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white hexagon one point up, with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) maroon border, 3 inches (7.62cm) in height and 2 1/8 inches (5.40cm) in width, a maroon cross throughout bearing a yellow six-pointed star.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors traditionally associated with the Medical Corps. The cross reflects medical aid and assistance while the gold star expresses excellence and achievement. The six-pointed star, echoed by the hexagon configuration of the insignia, alludes to the six New England states comprising the unit's command.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 804th Hospital Center on 17 Jul 1990. It was redesignated for the 804th Medical Brigade on 8 Apr 1999.

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U.S. Army 818th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 818th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a silver winged staff on a cross divided horizontally wavy maroon above blue surmounting and between two black snakes nowed, erect and respectant, all above and within a maroon scroll arcing to base and inscribed “LEADING IN CARE” in silver letters.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are colors traditionally associated with medical organizations. The winged staff and serpents, attributes of Aesculapius, the God of Medicine and Healing, together with the cross for aid and assistance, represent the basic mission of the unit. The wavy blue alludes to the parent unit’s service in the Rhineland during World War II. Also, the twin serpents with their double loops together with the vertical arm of the cross, simulate the numerical designation of the organization.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 818th Hospital Center on 18 June 1979. It was redesignated for the 818th Medical Brigade with the description and symbolism revised effective 17 September 1992.

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U.S. Army 818th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 818th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white disc within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) yellow border 2 3/4 inches (6.99 cm) in diameter overall, a cross throughout maroon, bearing a winged staff, all yellow.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are colors traditionally associated with medical organizations. The winged staff represents the mission of the unit. The yellow border symbolizes the complete and comprehensive support provided by the organization and continuity of service. Yellow or gold signifies excellence.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 818th Hospital Center on 12 October 1990. It was redesignated for the 818th Medical Brigade with the symbolism revised effective 17 September 1992.

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U.S. Army 8th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 8th Medical Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches in height overall consisting chevronwise of a black embattled partition line above a silver metal wingless caduceus surmounting a maroon Greek cross on a green background and all encircled by a continuous maroon scroll, divided in three folds and inscribed "STRENGTH THROUGH HEALTH" in silver letters.

Symbolism: Maroon and white are the colors used for the Army Medical Department. The cross, a symbol for aid and assistance, symbolizes the basic mission of the Brigade. The caduceus and the color green, a reference to the color of the ancient gowns of medicine, represents the high ideals and traditions of the healing arts. The entwined serpents also simulate the number "8" referring to the organization's numerical designation. The embattled partition line, representing a segment of early coastal fortification, alludes to the early history of Fort Hamilton, the present home area and location of the 8th Medical Brigade.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 13 September 1976.

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U.S. Army 8th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 8th Medical Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a Maroon octagon 2 1/2 inches in height overall bearing a white Greek cross surmounted by a yellow crown of seven points, (six points extending beyond the cross) all within a 1/8 inch white border.

Symbolism: The Greek cross, a symbol of aid and assistance is used to represent the 8th Medical Brigade. The crown alluding to New York referred to as the "Empire State" was suggested by the Statue of Liberty in New York harbor. In numerology the number eight symbolizes regeneration and achievement. The octagon shape furthermore alludes to the numerical designation of the 8th Medical Brigade. Maroon and white are colors used for the Army Medical Department.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 16 July 1976.

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