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U.S. Ordnance Corps


U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, branch insignia
Vector image of U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, branch insignia / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, branch insignia

A gold color metal shell and flame 1 inch in height.

The use of the "shell and flame" by the Ordnance Corps dates back to 1832; it is considered to be the oldest branch insignia of the Army. Similar insignia had been used by the British Army. After its adoption by the American Army, the design was used by the Artillery as well as the Ordnance until 1834 when the crossed cannon was adopted by the Artillery. In 1835, the shell and flame was used on a button for members of the Ordnance Corps and the design had been used in various items worn on the uniform since it was first adopted. The simplicity of the shell and flame harmonizes with the armament of days gone by, while the action it connotes is applicable with equal force to the weapons of today.

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U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, branch plaque
Vector image of U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, branch plaque / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, branch plaque

The plaque design has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is crimson.

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U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, regimental insignia
Vector image of U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, regimental insignia / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army Ordnance Corps, regimental insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches in height overall consisting of two gray antique cannons in saltire on a white disc behind an encircling scroll in the form of a buckle red belt with, between the intersecting cannons and the belt, a black antique bomb, its scarlet flames issuing at the top of the device from behind the belt, which bears the inscription "ORDNANCE CORPS U.S.A." in gold letters. The regimental insignia for the Ordnance Corps was approved on 25 March 1986.

The crossed cannons are representative of the Ordnance Corps' early relationship to the Artillery. The flaming bomb, also known as the shell and flame, represents the armament of days gone by, while the energy it connotes is applicable to the weapons of our own day. The cannoneer's belt, which encircles the flaming bomb and crossed cannons, is embossed with the words "ORDNANCE CORPS U.S.A." and represents the traditional association between munitions and armament. The white background symbolizes the Ordnance Corps' motto, "ARMAMENT FOR PEACE."

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U.S. Army 71st Ordnance Group, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 71st Ordnance Group, distinctive unit insignia

On a gold color metal and enamel red rectangle arced at top and bottom 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall, between five gold stars, one in top, a crossed gold lightning bolt and white sword point up with a gold hilt superimposed by a green projectile nose down garnished with a gold rotating band charged with a stylized gold bomb bearing a black fleur-de-lis. Arched around top is a blue scroll inscribed “WITH DISTINCTION” in gold letters and arched around the bottom, a blue scroll doubled gold inscribed with “AND VALOR” in gold letters.

Symbolism: Red (crimson) and gold (yellow) are the colors traditionally used by Army Ordnance. Red is also the color of the Meritorious Unit Commendation awarded the unit in World War II. The lightning bolt, adapted from the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Badge, recognizes boldness and rapid response. The green projectile with a gold rotating band and the gold stylized bomb represent ordnance and the professionalism of EOD personnel. The fleur-de-lis refers to the unit’s history of being activated in France. The drawn sword symbolizes the group’s readiness to engage in battle. The five stars commemorate the organization’s five campaigns from World War II and the following five core missions of the 71st Ordnance: Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High Yield Explosives (CBRNE).

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 23 November 2005.

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