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U.S. Military Police Corps


U.S. Army Military Police Corps, branch insignia
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U.S. Army Military Police Corps, branch insignia

Two crossed gold color metal pistols 3/4 inch in height.

The insignia was approved in 1922. The old type pistol sometimes referred to as the Harper's Ferry Pistol (made at the Harper's Ferry Arsenal), was selected since it is the first American Military pistol and remained the Army model for many years. The parts of this weapon were standardized and inter-changeable, thereby marking an advance in arms.

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U.S. Army Military Police Corps, branch plaque
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U.S. Army Military Police Corps, branch plaque

The plaque design has the branch insignia, letters, and rim in gold. The background is green.

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U.S. Army Military Police Corps, regimental coat of arms U.S. Army Military Police Corps, regimental coat of arms

The coat of arms appears on the breast of a displayed eagle on the regimental flag. The coat of arms is: Vert, a fasces palewise, axe Or and rods Proper (brown); thereover in fess a balance and in saltire overall a key with bow in sinister base and a sword with hilt in dexter base all of the second. The crest (On a wreath of the colors Or and Vert a pair of crossed pistols of the first) is displayed above the eagle's head. The background color of the flag is green and the fringe is yellow. The coat of arms was approved on 2 May 86.

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U.S. Army Military Police Corps, regimental insignia
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U.S. Army Military Police Corps, regimental insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches in height consisting of a shield blazoned as follows: Vert, a fasces palewise, axe Or and rods Proper (brown), thereover in fess a balance and in saltire overall a key with bow in sinister base and a sword with hilt in dexter base all of the second. The shield is enclosed at bottom and sides by a gold scroll of three folds inscribed ''ASSIST PROTECT DEFEND" in green letters and surmounted at the top by two crossed gold pistols. The regimental insignia was approved on 3 July 1986.

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U.S. Department of the Army Police, emblem (badge)
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U.S. Department of the Army Police, emblem (badge)

U.S. Army Hawaii Military Police Brigade, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Hawaii Military Police Brigade, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02cm) in width overall consisting of a stylized burst of medium blue rays superimposed by two red lightning flashes chevronwise reversed issuing a representation of King Kamehameha’s spear all enclosed in base by a green scroll inscribed "PACIFIC LIGHTNING" in gold.

Symbolism: Green and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Military Police organizations. The stylized burst of rays allude to the Pacific, the unit's location. The red lightning flashes denote speed and on the mark accuracy as well as alluding to the unit’s motto. The spear is a traditional Hawaiian weapon and underscores the unit’s mission.

The distinctive unit insignia was authorized on 17 Aug 1998.

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U.S. Army Hawaii Military Police Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Hawaii Military Police Brigade, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a green rectangle arced at top and bottom with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) yellow border 2 inches (5.08cm) in width and 3 inches (7.62cm) in height overall, a yellow representation of King Kamehameha’s spear between two red lightning flashes chevronwise reversed.

Symbolism: Green and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Military Police organizations. The red lightning flashes denote speed and on the mark accuracy as well as alluding to the unit’s motto. The spear is a traditional Hawaiian weapon and underscores the unit’s mission.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was authorized 17 Aug 1998.

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U.S. Army 105th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms U.S. Army 105th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Per fess enhanced indented Sable and Vert, three mullets fesswise, in base a scale superimposed by a fasces and an early American pistol saltirewise Or; a chief embattled of the like.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the North Carolina Army National Guard: From a wreath Or and Sable, a hornets' nest hanging from a bough beset with 13 hornets all Proper.

Motto: READY WHEN CALLED.

Symbolism
Shield: Green and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with the Military Police Corps. Black alludes to determination, power and protection. The green peaks recall the mountainous terrain around Asheville, North Carolina, the headquarters location of the unit. The peaks also highlight the seven values of the U.S. Army: loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity and personal courage. The scale, pistol and fasces are adapted from the Military Police regimental coat of arms. The fasces has been the symbol of authority throughout the ages. The scale represents justice and fairness. The pistol, Harper's Ferry armory issue, is the traditional Military Police symbol and underscores the Military Police Corps mission to uphold the law and keep order. The three stars and embattlements refer to the three words on the Military Police regimental insignia: Assist, Protect and Defend. The embattlements represent strength and defense.
Crest: The crest is that of the North Carolina Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was approved effective 1 September 2003.

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U.S. Army 105th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 105th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per fess enhanced indented Sable and Vert, three mullets fesswise, in base a scale superimposed by a fasces and an early American pistol saltirewise Or; a chief embattled of the like. Attached below the shield a Black scroll doubled and inscribed "READY WHEN CALLED" in Gold.

Symbolism: Green and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with the Military Police Corps. Black alludes to determination, power and protection. The green peaks recall the mountainous terrain around Asheville, North Carolina, the headquarters location of the unit. The peaks also highlight the seven values of the U.S. Army: loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity and personal courage. The scale, pistol and fasces are adapted from the Military Police regimental coat of arms. The fasces has been the symbol of authority throughout the ages. The scale represents justice and fairness. The pistol, Harper's Ferry armory issue, is the traditional Military Police symbol and underscores the Military Police Corps mission to uphold the law and keep the order. The three stars and embattlements refer to the three words on the Military Police regimental insignia: Assist, Protect and Defend. The embattlements represent strength and defense.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved effective 1 September 2003.

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U.S. Army 10th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 10th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Argent a saltire Vert overall, a parachute Azure corded Or surmounted by a weighing scales of the last grasped in a mailed fist palewise Gules.

Crest: From a wreath Argent and Vert a crenellated gateway Or with a raised portcullis Sable, bearing at top three shields bendwise in fess Gules, Argent and Azure and all superimposed in base by a sword and a key, bow and hilt to base, saltirewise Proper.

Motto: Justice from Above.

Symbolism
Shield: Green and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Military Police. The saltire refers to the Roman numeral "10" and the unit?s designation. The motto is recalled by the scales of justice and the descending parachute, the last also alluding to the unit?s airborne status. The mailed fist symbolizes authority, strength and the will and means to uphold the law. Blue refers to Airborne and worldwide capabilities, scarlet denotes courage, white indicates integrity. Together the colors refer to the United States.
Crest: World War II campaigns in central Europe and the Rhineland are recalled by the crenellated gateway. The red, white and blue shields refer to organizational colors associated with the unit and to the tricolor of France, whose regions of Normandy and Ardennes-Alsace saw campaign participation by the Tenth during the battle for Europe?s liberation. The United States is referred to again by the colors. The sword and key signify the dual responsibilities of defense and security and with the portcullis, the mission as carried out during the defense of Europe.

This insignia was approved on 22 Sep 1997.

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U.S. Army 10th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 10th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Argent a saltire Vert, a parachute of the first and Azure, overall a weighing scales of the first and Or, grasped in a mailed fist palewise Gules. Attached below the shield is a blue and silver scroll inscribed "JUSTICE FROM ABOVE" in silver.

Symbolism: Green represents the Military Police branch. The saltire refers to the Roman numeral 10, the unit?s designation. The motto is recalled by the scales of justice and the descending parachute, the last also alluding to association with Airborne. The mailed fist symbolizes authority and strength and the will and means to uphold the law. Blue refers to Airborne and worldwide capabilities, scarlet denotes courage, silver (white) indicates integrity. Together the colors refer again to Airborne and the United States. Gold (yellow) signifies excellence and in conjunction with green, the Military Police branch.

This insignia was approved on 22 Sep 1997.

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U.S. Army 112th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms U.S. Army 112th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Or, an arrowhead point up per pale Gules and Azure surmounted by a spear, palewise point to chief Vert fimbriated Argent barb of the last, overall a pair of Barongs in saltire of the like, all within a bordure Green.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Mississippi Army National Guard: From a wreath Or and Vert, a slip of magnolia full flower with leaves Proper behind a trident Sable.

Motto: GUARDIANS OF HONOUR.

Symbolism
Shield: The arrowhead and spear, representative of the arrowhead on the campaign streamer, is indicative of the Battalion’s participation in the assault landing on New Guinea during World War II. The crossed Barongs refer to service in the Philippines, World War II. The colors red, white, and blue represent the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation awarded the unit for service in World War II. The blue area is also commemorative of the Presidential Unit Citation awarded the Battalion. Green is the color of the Military Police Corps. The upright position of the spear further alludes to the capabilities of the Battalion in their current mission.
Crest: The crest is that of the Mississippi Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was approved on 26 January 1998. The insignia was amended to correct the spelling of the motto on 29 January 2009.

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U.S. Army 112th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 112th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in width consisting of a red and blue arrowhead surmounted by a spearhead of white affixed to a green shaft; overall two silver color metal Barongs in saltire. Attached below the device a silver metal scroll inscribed “GUARDIANS OF HONOUR” in black letters.

Symbolism: The arrowhead alludes to New Guinea, World War II. The spearhead, representative of the arrowhead on the campaign streamer, is indicative of the Battalion’s participation in the assault landing on New Guinea. The crossed Barongs refer to service in the Philippines, World War II. The colors red, white, and blue represent the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation awarded the unit for service in World War II. The blue area is also commemorative of the Distinguished Unit Citation awarded the Battalion. The green is the color of the Military Police Corps. The upright position of the spear further alludes to the capabilities of the Battalion in their current mission.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 13 December 1968.

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U.S. Army 115th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms U.S. Army 115th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Vert, a beam balance scale Or on a chief of the second a cross bottony per cross quarterly throughout Gules and Argent surmounted by an arrowhead Azure charged with a fleur-de-lis of the second.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Maryland Army National Guard: From a wreath of the colors (Or and Vert) a cross bottony per cross quarterly Gules and Argent.

Motto: MARYLAND'S FINEST.

Symbolism
Shield: Green and gold (yellow) are the colors associated with the Military Police Corps. The cross, taken from the Maryland State flag, indicates the home area of the unit. The beam balance scale stands for equal justice and lawful process as defended in the mission of the organization. The fleur-de-lis refers to France and the Central Europe areas where the unit was awarded campaign participation during World War I and four subsequent campaign credits during World War II. The arrowhead denotes the unit's assault landing at Normandy during the latter war.
Crest: The crest is that of the Maryland Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was approved on 10 June 1999.

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U.S. Army 115th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 115th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a bottony cross parted quarterly red and white with a pair of green scale pans suspended from a beam arced across the top and surmounting the cross with the point up, a blue arrowhead bearing a gold fleur-de-lis, all above a green scroll arced from the outer lateral arms and inscribed "MARYLAND'S FINEST" in gold letters, all open areas within the design of brick red.

Symbolism: Green and gold (yellow) are the colors used for the Military Police Corps and the cross indicates the Maryland Army National Guard. The scale pans connote equal justice in lawful processes in the overall mission of the organization. The fleur-de-lis refers to France and the central European areas where the unit participated in two campaigns during WWI and four campaigns during WWII. The arrowhead denotes the assault landing at Normandy during the latter war and blue refers to the award of the Presidential Unit Citation and red and green to the French Croix de Guerre. The brick red color, suggested by the organization, reflects assigned units.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 15 February 1974.

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U.S. Army 117th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms U.S. Army 117th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Or, on a bend sinister Vert between two fleurs-de-lis Azure, a pistol, muzzle upward, of the first.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Tennessee Army National Guard: From a wreath Or and Vert, upon a mount of the second a hickory tree Proper charged with three mullets one and two Argent.

Motto: OUR HISTORY, OUR STRENGTH.

Symbolism
Shield: Yellow and green are the colors traditionally associated with Military Police units. The bend sinister signifies security. The fleurs-de-lis represent the Battalion’s campaign credit during World War I and World War II. Blue indicates the unit’s past affiliation in the Infantry branch. The pistol illustrates the mission of Military Police.
Crest: The crest is that of the Tennessee Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was approved on 7 May 2009.

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U.S. Army 117th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 117th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in width overall consisting of a shield blazoned as follows: Or, on a bend sinister Vert between two fleurs-de-lis Azure, a pistol, muzzle upward of the first. Attached below the shield a Green scroll inscribed “OUR HISTORY, OUR STRENGTH” in Gold.

Symbolism: Yellow and green are the colors traditionally associated with Military Police units. The bend sinister signifies security. The fleurs-de-lis represent the Battalion’s campaign credit during World War I and World War II. Blue indicates the unit’s past affiliation in the Infantry branch. The pistol illustrates the mission of Military Police.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 7 May 2009.

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U.S. Army 136th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms U.S. Army 136th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Sable, a fesse enhanced and embattled Or, overall a magnifying glass palewise rim Argent (Silver Gray), the glass surmounting and enlarging the middle crenel between two merlons, the handle Gules edged of the second bearing a mullet Argent.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Texas Army National Guard: From a wreath Or and Sable a mullet Argent encircled by a garland of live oak and olive Proper.

Motto: SERVICE, SAFETY, SECURITY.

Symbolism
Shield: The magnifying glass in front of and enlarging a segment of the embattled line, symbolic of the military establishment together with the color black for cover and concealment alludes to criminal investigation and to the basic mission of the unit. The star refers to the State of Texas, home area of the unit.
Crest: The crest is that of the Texas Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was approved on 3 April 2006.

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U.S. Army 136th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 136th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel hexagonal device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a vertical gold rimmed magnifying glass with a red handle bearing at its middle section a white star, the glass in front of and enlarging the middle segment of a horizontal gold embattled line with two merlons all on a black background and encircled by a continuous green scroll divided into three segments inscribed “SERVICE, SAFETY, SECURITY” in gold letters.

Symbolism: Green and yellow (gold) are the colors used for the Military Police Corps. The magnifying glass in front of and enlarging a segment of the embattled line, symbolic of the military establishment together with the color black for cover and concealment alludes to criminal investigation and to the basic mission of the unit. The star refers to the State of Texas, home area of the unit.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved on 9 July 1971. It was rescinded on 21 March 1975. The insignia was reinstated with description updated on 3 April 2006.

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U.S. Army 19th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 19th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Per chevron Vert and Or, two swords points to chief chevronwise of the like and in base a rose Sable garnished of the second.

Crest: From a wreath Or and Vert a taeguk Proper, two arrows bendwise and two arrows reversed bendwise sinister interlaced in dexter and two arrows bendwise and two arrows reversed bendwise sinister interlaced on the sinister and overall a sword Or.

Motto: TRUTH IS OUR SWORD.

Symbolism
Shield: Green and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Military Police units. The chevron recalls a search-light cast on unlawful activities to determine the truth. The rose refers to the term "sub rosa," meaning secret. Black indicates the clandestine nature of these activities. The swords symbolize readiness and co-operation in the investigation of illegal activity. Yellow (gold) traditionally denotes excellence.
Crest: The taeguk represents the unit's participation in the Korean conflict, 1951 to 1953. Two Meritorious Unit Commendations were awarded during that period and are recalled by the color scarlet. The sword refers to the motto and symbolizes readiness and combat. The saltires of interlacing arrows allude to the several offensive, counteroffensive and defensive actions in which the unit participated in Korea. Together, the saltires and sword refer to the Roman numeral which is the battalion's designation. Gold denotes excellence.

The coat of arms was approved on 14 Aug 1998.

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U.S. Army 19th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 19th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Per chevron Vert and Or, two swords points to chief chevronwise of the like and in base a rose Sable of the second Vert garnished. Attached below the shield is a green scroll doubled and inscribed "TRUTH IS OUR SWORD" in gold.

Symbolism: Green and yellow are the colors traditionally used by Military Police units. The chevron recalls a search-light cast on unlawful activities to determine the truth. The rose refers to the term "sub rosa," meaning secret. Black indicates the clandestine nature of these activities. The swords symbolize readiness and cooperation in the investigation of illegal activity. Yellow (gold) traditionally denotes excellence.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 14 Aug 1998.

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U.S. Army 22nd Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 22nd Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Vert, a stylized eagle Sable fimbriated and detailed Or superimposed by a crenelated bridge of one arch throughout Or mortared Sable.

Crest: From a wreath Or and Vert a mount of the like bearing a fountain issuing nine demi-bamboo spears pilewise Proper.

Motto: INTEGRITY ABOVE ALL.

Symbolism
Shield: Green and yellow are the colors used by Military Police. The eagle represents constant vigilance, authority and total preparedness. The bridge symbolizes information as the key to a strong defense.

Crest: The nine bamboo spears represent the unit’s campaigns in Vietnam while the mount and fountain, a symbol for water, suggest an island, highlighting the unit’s World War II service and campaign in New Guinea.

The coat of arms was authorized on 1 Sep 1996.

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U.S. Army 22nd Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 22nd Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Vert, a stylized eagle Sable fimbriated and detailed Or superimposed by a crenelated bridge of one arch throughout Or mortared Sable. Attached above the shield is a black scroll inscribed "INTEGRITY ABOVE ALL" in gold.

Symbolism: Green and yellow are the colors used by Military Police. The eagle represents constant vigilance, authority and total preparedness. The bridge symbolizes information as the key to a strong defense.

The insignia was authorized on 1 Sep 1996.

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U.S. Army 40th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
Vector image of U.S. Army 40th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army 40th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Sable, between two demi-elephants statant addorsed, three bamboo trees Or with seven leaves and two leaves erect in base Vert fimbriated of the second, on a chief wavy of the last a mullet of the third.

Crest: From a wreath Or and Sable issuing from a wavy bar Celeste, a fasces Proper banded Gules intertwined with a stylized Oriental dragon of the first, armed and eyed Argent with pupil, tail, back spikes and langued of the fourth.

Motto: PEACE, JUSTICE, FREEDOM.

Symbolism
Shield: The two elephants of equal size symbolize fairness and justice. The elephant, a beast of burden in the Far East, represents the strength and ability of the Battalion to perform its mission. The bamboo tree, with its young shoots and large leaves, alludes to the overall police protection and the training of personnel. The star refers to leadership, guidance, and the high ideals of the unit. The wavy chief represents the unit’s overseas service, with its many rivers and waterways of the Far East. Green and yellow are the colors used for the Military Police.
Crest: The fasces, an ancient Roman symbol of higher magistrates’ authority, is adopted from the Military Police Regimental insignia. It highlights the law enforcement mission of the Military Police to uphold the law and keep order. The red color of the banding on the bundle commemorates the Meritorious Unit Citation the unit earned in the Pacific Theater. The Oriental dragon, a powerful and mythical creature in East Asian culture, represents the Battalion’s World War II campaign credit earned for the Asiatic-Pacific Theater. The dragon’s colors are adapted from that streamer.

The coat of arms was approved on 13 January 2009.

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U.S. Army 40th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 40th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in width consisting of three gold bamboo trees with green leaves, on the center leaf a gold star, all between two elephants (head and fore legs) one facing right, the other facing left, in base a fountain (wavy gold and blue), below all a black scroll with a green reverse side, bearing the inscription “PEACE, JUSTICE, FREEDOM” in gold letters.

Symbolism: The two elephants of equal size symbolize fairness and justice. The elephant, a beast of burden in the Far East, represents the strength and ability of the Battalion to perform its mission. The bamboo tree, with its young shoots and large leaves, alludes to the overall police protection and the training of personnel. The gold star refers to leadership, guidance, and the high ideals of the unit. The fountain represents the unit’s overseas service, also the many rivers and waterways of the Far East. Green and yellow are the colors used for the Military Police.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved on 15 June 1967. It was amended to update the description on 12 December 2008

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U.S. Army 51st Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 51st Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Per saltire Azure and Vert, a pile issuing from dexter chief and a pile issuing from sinister chief throughout conjoined Or bearing two maces saltirewise of the second, in chief a crescent Argent.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the South Carolina Army National Guard: From a wreath Or and Azure, upon a mount Vert a palmetto tree Proper charged with a crescent Argent.

Motto: READY TO RESPOND.

Symbolism
Shield: Green and yellow (gold) are colors used for the Military Police Corps. The white crescent on the blue was suggested by the flag of South Carolina to denote the unit’s location and assignment to the South Carolina Army National Guard. The crescent also signifies growing brightness and together with the gold rays refers to the Battalion’s investigation and crime prevention mission. The rays which simulate beams of light, also allude to the Battalion’s origin in the Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense). The maces, a historic weapon used by warriors and guards as a hand arm, represent the protective services provided by the organization.
Crest: The crest is that of the South Carolina Army National Guard.

The coat of arms was approved on 5 March 2008.

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U.S. Army 51st Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 51st Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of two gold rays issuing from base diagonally to the left and right saltirewise terminating in a convex arc across the top, each bearing a green mace saltirewise, spiked heads at the top, and between the rays at the top upon a blue arched interstice a white crescent with horns to upper left, and curved around green interstices at the sides and base of the rays a gold scroll inscribed “READY TO RESPOND” in green letters.

Symbolism: Green and yellow (gold) are colors used for the Military Police Corps. The white crescent on the blue was suggested by the flag of South Carolina to denote the unit’s location and assignment to the South Carolina Army National Guard. The crescent also signifies growing brightness and together with the gold rays refers to the Battalion’s investigation and crime prevention mission. The rays which simulate beams of light, also allude to the Battalion’s origin in the Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense). The maces, a historic weapon used by warriors and guards as a hand arm, represent the protective services provided by the organization.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 2 March 1971.

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U.S. Army 91st Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 91st Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Vert, a rudder Or.

Crest: From a wreath Or and Vert, two broadaxes in saltire Proper, surmounted by a baton palewise of the first, overall a Taeguk.

Motto: HONOR ABOVE ALL.

Symbolism
Shield: The shield is in the colors of the Military Police. The heraldic rudder is an allegorical representation of basic functions of the organization, control and guidance.
Crest: The broadaxes and baton represent military authority and justice, the mission of the 91st Military Police Battalion. The three elements allude to the decorations awarded to the unit. The Taeguk symbolizes the unit’s campaign service during the Korean War.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 91st Military Police Battalion on 6 September 1951. It was rescinded on 23 July 1963. The coat of arms was reinstated and amended to add a crest on 24 June 2005.

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U.S. Army 91st Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 91st Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall blazoned as follows: Vert, a rudder Or. Attached below the shield a Green scroll doubled Gold inscribed “HONOR ABOVE ALL” in Gold.

Symbolism: The shield is in the colors of the Military Police. The heraldic rudder is an allegorical representation of basic functions of the organization, control and guidance.

The insignia was originally approved for the 91st Military Police Battalion on 6 September 1951. It was retained for the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 91st Military Police Battalion on 23 July 1963. The insignia was amended to update the description on 16 May 2005.

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U.S. Army 92nd Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
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U.S. Army 92nd Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Vert, an annulet Or surmounted by two Oriental phoenixes addorsed Proper enfiled by a sword of the second.

Crest: From a wreath Or and Vert, in front of two swords in saltire of the first, points up, a fasces of the last garnished Gules with a double axe head, charged in the middle with an eight-pointed star Yellow, the blades in the colors and configuration of a Taeguk.

Motto: None.

Symbolism
Shield: Green and yellow are the colors traditionally associated with the Military Police Corps. The two white Oriental phoenixes are adapted from the flag of the President of the Republic of Korea and represent the two Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations awarded to the Battalion. The phoenix, a mythical bird, emerges from the ashes of destruction to herald an auspicious event, rule by law and order. The sword represents military power and justice. The interlacing of the charges refer to the maintenance of law and order by means of military justice; the ring represents security.
Crest: The blades of the axe head symbolizing the Taeguk, represent the Battalion’s campaign in Korea, with the two swords recalls the cooperation of the United States and the Republic of Korea forces during the Korean Conflict. The eight-pointed star, adapted from the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, alludes to the unit’s military service in the Dominican Republic. The bamboo poles of the fasces recall the Battalion’s military service in Vietnam, beginning in 1966 and ending in 1970. The red crossed straps suggest the Meritorious Unit Commendation and the Army Superior Unit Award earned by the Battalion. The third strap signifies the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry awarded to the unit by the Vietnamese government.

The coat of arms was originally approved on 28 October 1993. It was amended to include a crest on 23 March 2006.

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U.S. Army 92nd Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 92nd Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel insignia 1 1/2 inches (3.81 cm) in height overall, consisting of a gold sword interlaced with two white Oriental phoenixes addorsed, all surmounting a green disc with a gold border. Symbolism The two white Oriental phoenixes are from the flag of the President of the Republic of Korea. They stand for the two Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations awarded to the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment of the Battalion. The phoenix, a mythical or legendary bird, emerges from the ashes of destruction to herald an auspicious event, rule by law and order. The sword represents military powe4r and justice. The interlacing of the charges refer to the maintenance of law and order by means of military justice. Green and yellow are for the Military Police Corps. The ring enclosing the green area is for security. Background The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved on 27 June 1966. It was amended to correct the description and symbolism on 22 September 1989.

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U.S. Army 93th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
Vector image of U.S. Army 93th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army 93th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Quarterly Vert and Argent, within a quatrefoil quarterly counterchanged and voided of the field, a column of the second edged at dexter base and sinister chief of the first, surmounted at fess point by two keys in saltire Or, wards upward, edged in second and third quarter of the first.

Crest: From a wreath Argent and Vert, two Vietnamese spears in saltire Proper, overall three spears palewise erect, shafts Brün, garnished Sable, spearheads Or superimposed by a scorpion Buff, bearing on its abdomen a fusil Gules.

Motto: STRIKE HARD, STRIKE FAST.

Symbolism
Shield: The green segments of the background and the quatrefoil denote the four campaign streamers awarded the Battalion in the Korean War. The column represents strength and the gold keys represent security, both elements being the concern of the Battalion.
Crest: The spears, weapons used in Vietnam, refer to service in that country. The crossed spears and the three spears signify the unit’s 13 Vietnam campaign credits; the three gold spearheads suggest the decorations for duty in Vietnam. The scorpion, a desert insect known for its deadly sting, alludes to the 93d Military Police Battalion’s motto “Strike Hard, Strike Fast,” also suggesting the unit campaign participation in Southwest Asia. The fusil indicates the Battalion’s capability to complete each mission; red symbolizes the meritorious unit commendation awarded.

The coat of arms was approved on 13 December 2007.

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U.S. Army 93th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 93th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a quatrefoil shaped background of green. Divided horizontally and vertically into four segments and charged with a vertical silver column behind two gold crossed keys

Symbolism: The green background is divided into four repeating segments alluding to the four campaign streamers awarded to the Battalion in the Korean War. The silver column represents strength, and the gold keys represent security, both elements being the concern of the Battalion.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 16 June 1966. It was amended to update the description and symbolism on 8 November 2007.

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U.S. Army 95th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
Vector image of U.S. Army 95th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army 95th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Vert, on a bend wavy Or between two griffins' heads couped of the last an oriental sword Sable.

Crest: On a wreath of the colors Or and Vert a rocky mound of the last and thereon a bamboo portcullis (gate) of three perpendicular bars Proper spiked Gules.

Motto: SECURITY LAW ORDER.

Symbolism
Shield: Green and yellow (gold) are the colors used for the Military Police Corps. The griffin is a mythological creature famed for the attributes of vigilance, courage and strength and alludes to the unit. The color black suggests the robes of justices and the sword denotes leadership and military. The griffin heads, wavy bend and oriental sword together refer to the unit's three activations overseas: two in Europe and one in Asia.
Crest: The bamboo portcullis alludes to Asia and the red spikes represent the Meritorious Unit Citations, one for Korea and two for Vietnam. The rocky mound and portcullis symbolize the adverse terrain, guerilla attacks and transient camps during the unit's mission in Korea. The portcullis and spikes also refer to security at Long Binh Ammunition Depot and the establishment of law and order for Long Binh Post during the Vietnam Conflict.

The coat of arms was approved on 24 April 1974.

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U.S. Army 95th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 95th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A gold colored metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a green four pointed star surmounted by two gold clamps in saltire.

Symbolism: Green and yellow are the colors used for the Military Police. The crossed clamps designating a restrictive or restraining force and the star for guidance symbolize the mission of the Military Police Battalion.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 26 April 1966.

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U.S. Army 96th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms
Vector image of U.S. Army 96th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army 96th Military Police Battalion, coat of arms

Shield: Vert, a buckle with tongue palewise Or, on a chief of the like between two mullets of the first a Taeguk.

Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Or and Vert, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Motto: UNITY IS OUR STRENGTH.

Symbolism
Shield: Green and yellow are the branch colors of the Military Police Corps. The buckle stands for security and fidelity in authority. The Taeguk commemorates the unit’s war service in Korea and the stars honor their two Korea Presidential Unit Citations.
Crest: The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.

The coat of arms was approved on 5 March 2004.

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U.S. Army 96th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 96th Military Police Battalion, distinctive unit insignia

A gold colored metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a gold buckle, tongue pointing up, above a green scroll inscribed with the unit’s motto in gold letters, “UNITY IS OUR STRENGTH.”

Symbolism: The buckle stands for fidelity in authority and for security. The colors green and yellow are for the Military Police Corps.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 18 April 1966.

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