Military Insignia & Badges
WEB Gallery of military badges, crests, flags and patch designs
« Home
USA USA flag

U.S. Army Schools


U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02cm) in height overall consisting of a disc composed of three equal vertical stripes of blue enamel, yellow enamel and scarlet enamel, the blue stripe to the left, surmounting a gold sword and gold torch of liberty with scarlet enamel flames saltirewise, the sword point upward to the left and the flames arched toward and touching the sword point, all superimposed upon and extending over the top of a disc scored with wavy lines and bearing throughout a hexagonal fort all gold; and edging the disc upon a scroll composed of two concentric blue enamel arcs one on each side extending from the sword tip and flame respectively and joined in base by a wavy gold band, the inscription "FREEDOM'S" on the left and "FORTRESS" on the right in gold letters.

Symbolism: Except for the central disc which has been changed to three vertical stripes of blue, yellow and scarlet to reflect the Training and Doctrine Command shoulder sleeve insignia, the distinctive badge is the same as that of the former Continental Army Command. The torch from the Statue of Liberty, and the hexagonal fort and outer wavy lines (irregular hexagon surrounded by a water-filled moat) simulate Fort Monroe, the headquarters of the Training and Doctrine Command (and formerly that of the Continental Army Command), and refer to the motto "FREEDOM'S FORTRESS." The sword and the light of the torch allude to the Command's training and doctrine responsibility and mission.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 1 Jul 1973.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), shoulder sleeve insignia

A disc 2 1/2 inches (6.35cm) in diameter overall consisting of three vertical stripes of equal width of blue, yellow and scarlet, the blue to the left, all within a 1/8 inch (.32cm) Army green border.

Symbolism: The shoulder sleeve insignia was formerly that of the Replacement and School Command, World War II, which was charged with the responsibility of training Army personnel. The three stripes are in the colors of, and refer to, the basic combat arms; they also refer to the components of the "One Army" concept: Active Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Replacement and School Command on 22 Mar 1943. It was reassigned to the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command on 1 Jul 1973. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-558)

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (C&GSC), Combined Arms Center (CAC) & Fort Leavenworth, device (coat of arms) U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (C&GSC), Combined Arms Center (CAC) & Fort Leavenworth, device (coat of arms)

Shield: Argent, a chevron Azure between three lamps of the like flamed Proper.

Crest: On a wreath of the colors (Argent and Azure), an eagle displayed Proper in his beak a scroll or bearing the word "Leavenworth" Gules.

Motto: Ad Bellum Pace Parati (Prepared in peace for war) in blue letters.

Helmet and mantling: The helmet is an esquire's steel helmet in profile with closed visor Proper. The mantling to be Gules.

Symbolism: Shield: The chevron is indicative of the martial character of the College and the three lamps symbolize study and learning and also typify the three-part Army -- the Regular Army, the Army National Guard and the Army Reserve.

Crest: The eagle crest is the National emblem and, as perched with wings extended, is indicative of alertness. It is in appearance much like the eagle which surmounted the salle porte of the main school building in 1925; the scroll in his beak carries the word "LEAVENWORTH," the site of the College.

Helmet and Mantling: The helmet is the helmet of a gentleman or esquire. The red mantling with the colors of the shield completes the National colors.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the General Service Schools on 6 Jan 1925. It was redesignated to the Command and General Staff College on 14 Apr 1948.

U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (C&GSC), flagFLAG
The flag for the Command and General Staff College is blue with yellow fringe. The device of the College is centered on the flag (TIOH drawing 5-1-167).

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (C&GSC), Combined Arms Center (CAC) & Fort Leavenworth, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (C&GSC), Combined Arms Center (CAC) & Fort Leavenworth, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel insignia 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a blue enamel rectangle on which is centered the device for the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the Command and General Staff School on 16 Jun 1938. It was redesignated for the Command and General Staff College on 14 Apr 1948. On 30 Oct 1974, authorization for wear of the insignia was extended to personnel assigned to the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (C&GSC), Combined Arms Center (CAC) & Fort Leavenworth, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (C&GSC), Combined Arms Center (CAC) & Fort Leavenworth, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white shield 2 1/2 inches (6.35cm) in width and 2 1/2 inches (6.35cm) in height overall, with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) red border, a blue chevron between three blue lamps with red flames, two at the top above chevron and one below.

Symbolism: The design is based on the shield of the device approved for the school.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Command General Staff College on 1 Jul 1955. It was amended on 4 Dec 1956, to revise the description. On 30 Oct 1974, authorization for wear of the insignia was extended to personnel assigned to the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-189)

U.S. Army Combined Arms Center (CAC) & Fort Leavenworth, flagFLAG:
The flag for the Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth is teal blue with yellow fringe. The shoulder sleeve insignia is centered on the flag (TIOH drawing 5-1-76).

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA), device (coat of arms) U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA), device (coat of arms)

Blazon.
Shield: Per chevron embowed abased Vert and chevrony of six Or and Sable, in chief over a mullet inclosed by an open laurel wreath of the second a chain of three circular links fesswise throughout, the central link, encircling the mullet, between the two outer links rimwise all of the last.
Crest: On a wreath of the colors Or and Vert, a torch Azure (dark blue) flamed Proper, in front of a sword, blade to chief and quill pen, point to base, saltirewise all of the first, and all surmounting and extending over an open book with pages Argent and binding Gules.
Motto: ULTIMA (The Ultimate).

Symbolism.
Shield: The colors Army green and yellow and the embowed chevrons are associated with the basic device for the noncommissioned officers' insignia of grade. The gold links refer to the role of the Sergeants Major as the link between the enlisted men and the organization commander. The star which signifies command also indicates the high evaluation required by senior noncommissioned officers for the advanced schooling and training in the Academy, the senior NCO school. The laurel wreath, signifying past meritorious performance needed for selection, and the star and chevrons are all emblems suggested by the highest insignia of grade for noncommissioned officers; they denote the Academy's continued endeavor in training for the highest personal and professional achievements.
Crest: The torch in dark blue, which was established as the National Color in Army Regulations 1821, is flamed to indicate zeal and together with the book signifies conveyance of knowledge and instruction in techniques required for enlightened leadership. The sword and quill pen represent both the combat and technical administrative services from which the Academy's students are selected.

The device was approved on 6 Nov 1972.

U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA), flagFLAG:
The flag for the Sergeants Major Academy is ultramarine blue with white fringe. The Academy's device is centered on the flag (TIOH drawing 5-1-493).

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18cm) in height overall consisting of the shield, crest and motto of the coat of arms.

Symbolism: Shield: The colors Army green and yellow and the embowed chevrons are associated with the basic device for the noncommissioned officers' insignia of grade. The gold links refer to the role of the Sergeants Major as the link between the enlisted men and the organization commander. The star which signifies command also indicates the high evaluation required by senior noncommissioned officers for the advanced schooling and training in the Academy, the senior NCO school. The laurel wreath, signifying past meritorious performance needed for selection, and the star and chevrons are all emblems suggested by the highest insignia of grade for noncommissioned officers; they denote the Academy's continued endeavor in training for the highest personal and professional achievements.

Crest: The torch in dark blue, which was established as the National Color in Army Regulations 1821, is flamed to indicate zeal and together with the book signifies conveyance of knowledge and instruction in techniques required for enlightened leadership. The sword and quill pen represent both the combat and technical administrative services from which the Academy's students are selected.

Motto: The motto "ULTIMA" is translated "The Ultimate."

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 6 Nov 1972.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy (USASMA), shoulder sleeve insignia

On an Army green shield 2 1/4 inches (5.72cm) in width and 3 1/4 inches (8.26cm) in length overall, a gold color torch with scarlet flame, the stem of the torch surmounted by a gold color five-pointed star within an open gold color laurel wreath, all within a 1/8 inch (.32cm) Army green border.

Symbolism: The shield is symbolic of confidence, boldness and protection. The wreath and star simulate, and were suggested by, the insignia of grade associated with that of command sergeant major; the star is emblematic of guidance and the laurel wreath of achievement and merit. The torch symbolizes leadership, education and training and the flame alludes to zeal and action. The color gold signifies excellence and wisdom; and the color Army green alludes to the all-Army purpose of the Academy; it also is symbolic of faithfulness and obedience.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 2 Feb 1973. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-559)

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute (USASSI), device (coat of arms) U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute (USASSI), device (coat of arms)

Shield: Vert, between two mullets in fess a torch palewise Argent inflamed proper and debruised in base of a heneage knot Azure fimbriated Or.
Crest: From a wreath of the colors, Argent and Vert, a lamp of knowledge Or inflamed proper.
Motto: A scroll Or doubled Argent inscribed PRAECIPERE MILITI (Teaching the Soldier) Sable.

Symbolism: The green background represents the green of the countryside near Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, the original location of the organization. The torch and heneage knot are adapted from the shoulder sleeve insignia of the original unit's parent organization at the time the insignia was adopted, the U.S. Army Administrative Schools Center. Gold and silver represent the enduring value of the knowledge imparted by the schools that comprise the Institute. The two white stars are symbolic of guidance and leadership.

U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute (USASSI), flagFLAG:
The organizational flag for the Soldier Support Institute is Teal Blue with a yellow fringe. The Soldier Support Institute device is centered on the flag.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute (USASSI), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute (USASSI), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches in height overall consisting of a green enamel shield bearing at center between two white enamel five-pointed stars, a white enamel torch with flame of gold and scarlet enamel and in front of the lower half of the torch a blue enamel heneage knot with a small loop in base; below the shield a gold scroll bearing in blue enamel letters "PRAECIPERE MILITI."

Symbolism: The green background represents the green of the countryside near Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, the original location of the organization. The torch and heneage knot are adapted from the shoulder sleeve insignia of the original unit's parent organization at the time the insignia was adopted, the U.S. Army Administrative Schools Center. Gold and silver represent the enduring value of the knowledge imparted by the schools that comprise the Institute. The two white stars are symbolic of guidance and leadership. The Latin motto is "Teaching the Soldier".

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Institute of Administration (a subordinate element of the U.S. Army Administrative Schools Center) on 23 July 1973. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Soldier Support Center effective on 3 June 1980 and redesignated for the U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute effective 1 October 1994.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute (USASSI), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute (USASSI), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a light blue shield arched convexly at top and edged with a 1/8 inch scarlet border, 3 inches in height overall, a gray torch enflamed yellow and surmounted in base with a dark blue cord intertwined as a heneage knot.

Symbolism: The torch is used to symbolize scholarship and leadership. The heneage knot is representative of the multiple training missions. Silver gray and golden yellow are the colors of the Finance Corps. Blue and scarlet are colors of the Adjutant General Corps. Light blue is the color used to represent Defense organizations and indicates the mission of the organization in training for all military services.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the U.S. Army Administrative Schools Center on 10 January 1973. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army Administration Center on 10 December 1974; redesignated for the U.S. Army Soldier Support Center on 4 November 1980; and authorized for the U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute on 1 October 1994.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Warrant Office Career Center, device (coat of arms) U.S. Army Warrant Office Career Center, device (coat of arms)

Shield: Brün, on a saltire Or between three mullets, two in chief and one in base, of the last, two cannons in saltire, muzzles upward, Or (Gold), charged with a stylized mine case Azure.
Crest: From a wreath Or and Brün, a torch enflamed between a wreath of laurel all of the first.
Motto: STRENGTH IN KNOWLEDGE.

Symbolism
Shield: Brown is the color traditionally associated with the Warrant Officer Corps. The cannons with the blue mine case allude to the Warrant Officer Corps’ lineage in the Army Mine Planter Service as part of the Coast Artillery. The enflamed torch symbolizes enlightenment and dynamic learning. The three stars signify the three components of the Army that will gain intensive military guidance from the Center – Regular Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve.
Crest: The laurel wreath, adapted from the Warrant Officer collar insignia, represents victory and achievement.

The device was approved on 31 October 2008.

U.S. Army Warrant Office Career Center, flagFLAG:
The flag for the Warrant Officer Career Center is brown with yellow fringe. The device is centered on the flag.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Warrant Office Career Center, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army Warrant Office Career Center, distinctive unit insignia

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height blazoned as follows: Brün, on a saltire Or between three mullets, two in chief and one in base, of the last, two cannons in saltire, muzzles upward, Or (Gold), charged with a stylized mine case Azure. CREST: From a wreath Or and Brün, a torch enflamed between a wreath of laurel all of the first; attached below the shield a Blue scroll inscribed “STRENGTH IN KNOWLEDGE” in Gold.

Symbolism: Brown is the color traditionally associated with the Warrant Officer Corps. The cannons with the blue mine case allude to the Warrant Officer Corps’ lineage in the Army Mine Planter Service as part of the Coast Artillery. The enflamed torch symbolizes enlightenment and dynamic learning. The three stars signify the three components of the Army that will gain intensive military guidance from the Center – Regular Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve. The laurel wreath, adapted from the Warrant Officer collar insignia, represents victory and achievement.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 4 September 2008.

/ TIOH

U.S. Army Warrant Office Career Center, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army Warrant Office Career Center, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a Brown shield shaped embroidered item blazoned as follows: Brün, two cannons in saltire Or, overall a torch enflamed of the last charged with a stylized mine case Azure, all between three mullets, two in chief and one in base Or; within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) Yellow border. Overall dimensions are 3 1/4 inches (8.26 cm) in height and 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in width.

Symbolism: Brown is the color traditionally associated with the Warrant Officer Corps. The cannons with the blue mine case allude to the Warrant Officer Corps’ lineage in the Army Mine Planter Service as part of the Coast Artillery. The enflamed torch symbolizes enlightenment and dynamic learning. The three stars signify the three components of the Army that will gain intensive military guidance from the Center – Regular Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 4 September 2008.

/ TIOH

© CivicHeraldry.com 2008-2017