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U.S. Army General Staff


U.S. Army General Staff, branch insignia
Vector image of U.S. Army General Staff, branch insignia / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army General Staff, branch insignia

The coat of arms of the United States, 5/8 inch in height, of gold color metal superimposed on a five-pointed silver color star, 1 inch in circumscribing diameter. The shield to be in enamel stripes of white and red, chief of blue, and the glory blue.

On 17 June 1904, the Chief of Staff of the Army, Lieutenant General Chaffee, approved the design of the General Staff insignia to take effect 1 July 1904. The device has been in continual use since that date. The insignia was originally worn only by officers, in the grade of captain and above, detailed to the General Staff Corps. Authority for its wear was later extended to officers detailed to General Staff Corps with troops. At the time the Department of the Army was established as the legal successor to the War Department, the word "Corps" in the title of branch officers detailed to the General Staff Corps was dropped. The device is now worn by officers detailed in orders to the Army General Staff and to General Staff with troops.

The star is symbolic of the highest level in the Army, and the Arms of the United States allude to the mission of the General Staff which is the exercise General Staff supervision over the management of the land forces of the United States.

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U.S. Army General Staff, identification badge
Vector image of U.S. Army General Staff, identification badge / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army General Staff, identification badge

Description: The Coat of Arms of the United States in gold with the stripes of the shield to be enameled white and red and chief of the shield and the sky of the glory to be enameled blue, superimposed on a five-pointed black enameled star; in each reentrant angle of the star are three green enameled laurel leaves. The star is 3 inches in diameter for the Chief of Staff and former Chiefs of Staff and a 2 inches in diameter badge is authorized for all other personnel awarded the badge.

Symbolizm: The badge is based on the General Staff insignia with a black star in lieu of the Silver Star. The addition of the laurel leaves indicate achievement.

Eligibility: The badge is awarded by principal officials of Headquarters, Department of the Army to military personnel serving on their staff and within their subordinate agencies. Eligibility criteria for wear and permanent issue are contained in Department of the Army Memorandum 672-1. Permanent issue must be authorized by principal officials with the certificate of authorization constituting authority for wearing the badge as a permanent part of the uniform.

Date approved: The badge was first proposed by General MacArthur, while Chief of Staff, in a conversation with Brigadier General Andrew Moses, then Assistant Chief of Staff, G1, War Department General Staff, on 28 December 1931. Subsequently, the badge was designed by the Office of the Quartermaster General and approved by the Chief of Staff, General MacArthur, on 28 July 1933. It was announced on 23 August 1933 in War Department Circular No. 45 and award was made retroactive to 4 June 1920. Sergeants Major were authorized to be awarded the badge effective 30 September 1978 and the effective date for Warrant Officers was 22 August 1979. The lapel button for civilian personnel in the grade of GS-11 and higher was authorized effective 1 July 1982. The Army Chief of Staff, General Wickham, also approved a change in the name of the badge from Army General Staff Identification Badge to Army Staff Identification Badge. On 4 May 2004, the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1, approved changes to the eligibility requirements.

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U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to Chief of Army Staff
Vector image of U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to Chief of Army Staff / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to Chief of Army Staff

A shield 3/4 inch in height divided from lower left to upper right, the upper part red and the lower part white, a silver five-pointed star surmounted by the coat of arms of the United States in gold, between two white five-pointed stars at the top and two red five-pointed stars in base, with a gold color eagle with wings reversed, ½ inch in height, placed above the shield.

Prior to 1963, Aides to the Chief of Staff wore the same insignia as aides to other generals. On 25 April 1963, the present design of insignia for aide to the Chief of Staff was approved.

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U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to General of the Army
Vector image of U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to General of the Army / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to General of the Army

A blue shield, 3/4 inch in height, with five white stars arranged in a circle, inner points touching, surmounted above by a gold color eagle displayed with wings reversed ½ inch in height.

The insignia for Aides to General of the Army was approved on 15 January 1945.

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U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to Vice Chief of Army Staff U.S. Army, insignia of Aide to Vice Chief of Army Staff

A shield 3/4 inch in height divided saltirewise, the upper and lower part white and each side red, a silver five-pointed star surmounted by the coat of army of the United States in gold, between two red stars at the top and two red stars at the bottom, with a gold color eagle with wings reversed ½ inch in height place above the shield.

Prior to 1987, Aides to the Vice-Chief of Staff wore the same insignia as aides to other generals. On 10 June 1987, the insignia for aide to the Vice Chief of Staff was approved.

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