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U.S. Army 124th Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 124th Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a white star between and above two smaller white stars, all above two white horizontal bars, and rising from base three green needle-leaf trees, the large center tree terminating above the upper bar and in front of two small trees with apexes above the lower bar, all on a red background enclosed by a gold scroll terminating on each side of the top star and inscribed “MEET THE CHALLENGE” in red letters.

Symbolism: The star at the apex emphasizes the command supervision mission of the organization. The unit’s location in the state of Washington is indicated by the three white stars and two bars upon a red background suggested by the coat of arms of George Washington, for whom the state was named. The green needle-leaf trees also refer to the “Evergreen State.” Additionally, the treetops rising to the stars allude to the spirit of the Command’s motto, “MEET THE CHALLENGE.”

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 124th U.S. Army Reserve Command on 30 September 1970. It was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army 124th Regional Support Command.

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U.S. Army 124th Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 124th Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a red disc within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) green border 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in diameter overall, issuing from the top between two white five-pointed stars and surmounting two white horizontal bars, a green wedge point to base bordered white and bearing a larger white five-pointed star.

Symbolism: The three stars above the two bars and the colors red and white were suggested by the coat of arms of George Washington, whose portrait appears on the state flag of Washington and for whom the state is named. The color green also refers to the state of Washington which is known as the “Evergreen State,” the wedge shape and surrounding border alluding to the state’s abundant forests. The center star is depicted larger than the other two to emphasize the command and supervision of the organization.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 124th U.S. Army Reserve Command on 7 August 1968. It was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army 124th Regional Support Command. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-503)

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U.S. Army 63rd Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 63rd Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 (3.02 cm) in diameter consisting of a silver chevron on a red background bearing seven blue wavy vertical bands; in base a black embattled area with two merlons; encircling all, a continuous silver scroll of four folds inscribed on the upper three folds, "PRIDE" "HONOR" "SERVICE" in black letters. Overall, a yellow vertical sword, the tip charged with a scarlet drop.

Symbolism: The elements of the design reflect the history of the 63d Infantry Division. The silver chevron simulates a spearhead and is indicative of the aggressiveness displayed by the 63d Infantry Division during the crossing of seven European rivers--the Saar, Rhine, Neckar, Jagst, Kocker, Rems, and Danube--during World War II. The rivers are represented by the seven blue wavy bands. The breaching of the Siegfried line at St. Ingbert and Hassell is symbolized by the two black merlons of the embattled area surmounted by the yellow sword with the scarlet drop taken from the shoulder sleeve insignia of the organization.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 63d U.S. Army Reserve Command on 8 May 1970. It was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army 63d Regional Support Command. The insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army Regional Readiness Command effective 16 July 2003. It was redesignated effective 17 September 2008, for the 63d Regional Support Command.

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U.S. Army 63rd Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 63rd Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a pear-shaped olive drab background 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in width and 3 1/2 inches (8.89 cm) in length a scarlet flame of five rays superimposed by a gold sword in pale charged with a scarlet drop.

Symbolism: The design was inspired by a statement of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill at the 1943 Casablanca Conference that the “enemy would bleed and burn in expiation of their crimes against humanity.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 63d Infantry Division on 27 March 1943. It was authorized for the 63d U.S. Army Reserve Command on 22 April 1968. It was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army 63d Regional Support Command. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 July 2003, for the U.S. Army 63d Regional Readiness Command. It was redesignated effective 17 September 2008, for the 63d Regional Support Command and amended to add a symbolism.

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U.S. Army 81st Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 81st Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a blue octagon bearing a vertical gold stripe throughout the center charged with a blue star at top and overall in base a black wildcat and extending over the left side of the octagon a gold eight-rayed sun and over the right side a gold fleur-de-lis; arched across the top on a gold scroll the inscription "TRAIN" and convexly arched in base, terminating on each side in back of the sun and fleur-de-lis, a gold scroll inscribed "MAINTAIN" on the left and "SUSTAIN" on the right, all letters black.

Symbolism: The black wildcat is from the shoulder sleeve insignia of the original organization, the 81st Division, and also refers to that unit's nickname. The sun from the flag of the President of the Philippines commemorates the organization's World War II Philippine Presidential Unit Citation, and the fleur-de-lis is for the World War I campaign awards. The star denotes Command activities. The octagon and vertical stripe allude to the numerical designation of the organization.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 81st U.S. Army Reserve Command on 12 June 1970. It was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army 81st Regional Support Command, with the description and symbolism revised. The insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army 81st Regional Readiness Command effective 16 July 2003. It was redesignated effective 17 September 2008, for the 81st Regional Support Command.

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U.S. Army 81st Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 81st Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On an olive drab disc edged with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) black border a black wildcat passant. The overall dimension is 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in diameter.

Symbolism: The wildcat is common to the Carolinas from which many of the personnel of the Division came during World War I.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 81st Division by telegram on 19 October 1918. On 29 June 1922, it was officially announced. The insignia was redesignated for the 81st Infantry Division on 11 May 1964, retroactive to 1 August 1942. On 22 April 1968, it was authorized for the 81st U.S. Army Reserve Command. The insignia was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army 81st Regional Support Command. It was redesignated for the U.S. Army 81st Regional Readiness Command effective 16 July 2003. The insignia was redesignated effective 17 September 2008, for the 81st Regional Support Command and amended to add a symbolism. The 81st Division is credited as being the first unit to have a shoulder sleeve insignia.

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U.S. Army 88th Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 88th Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of the head of a silver three-pronged halberd in front of and extending beyond the base of a blue quatrefoil having a silver demi-fleur-de-lis issuing from the upper lobe, all beneath an arched silver scroll bearing the inscription” VERITAS CAPUT” in red letters, the space between the quatrefoil and scroll divided vertically green and red.

Symbolism: The blue quatrefoil is suggestive of the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 88th Division. The demi-fleur-de-lis refers to the division’s World War I service in France. The colors green, white and red of the Italian national flag, together with the three-pronged halberd, a medieval infantry weapon, symbolize the three battle honors earned in Italy during World War II. The colors red and green further allude to the award of the French Croix de Guerre with Palm for “Central Italy.” The blue quatrefoil also simulates a lake and, with the fleur-de-lis, a compass symbol for “north,” refers to the organization’s location in Minnesota, known for its numerous lakes.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally authorized for the 88th U.S. Army Reserve Command on 2 April 1970. It was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996, for the U.S. Army 88th Regional Support Command with the description and symbolism revised. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 July 2003, for the U.S. Army 88th Regional Readiness Command. It was redesignated effective 17 September 2008, for the 88th Regional Support Command.

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U.S. Army 88th Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 88th Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

A blue quatrefoil (two figure 8”s crossing at right angles) 2 1/4 inches (5.72cm) in height, width of loops 15/16 inch (2.38cm).

Symbolism: The four leaf clover, formed by the two figures “8” represents the Dakotas, Minnesota, Iowa and Illinois from which personnel of the Division originally came. Blue is symbolic of Infantry.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 88th Division by telegram on 12 November 1918. It was officially announced on 29 June 1922. It was amended to correct the measurement on 11 October 1922. The insignia was reassigned and authorized effective 16 April 1996 for the U.S. Army 88th Regional Support Command. It was redesignated effective 16 July 2003, for the U.S. Army 88th Regional Readiness Command. The insignia was redesignated effective 17 September 2008, for the 88th Regional Support Command and amended to add a symbolism.

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U.S. Army 99th Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 99th Regional Support Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of a king chess piece of white enamel on a black enamel area enclosed laterally by two blue and white checky squares of nine pieces each, five blue and four white, and arched to base passing behind the lower portion of the chess piece two bars, the inner green and the other red, both terminating at the checky squares, and arched across the top a gold scroll bearing “CHECKMATE” in black letters.

Symbolism: The king chess piece denotes authority and leadership and relates to the command aspects of the unit’s mission. The blue and white checks on the black area refer to the arms of the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the original home of the previous organization, and to the shoulder sleeve insignia of the 99th Infantry Division. The dual nine number of checks relates to the former and present numerical designation of the organization. Green and red are references to the colors of the Belgium Fourragére awarded the original unit for the Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe Campaigns during World War II. The Rhineland Campaign is referred to by the colors from the Provencal Arms: green, white (silver), and black.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally authorized for the 99th U. S. Army Reserve Command on 13 May 1970. It was reassigned and authorized for the U.S. Army 99th Regional Support Command on 16 April 1996. The Insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army 99th Regional Readiness Command effective 16 July 2003. It was redesignated effective 17 September 2008, for the 99th Regional Support Command.

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U.S. Army 99th Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 99th Regional Support Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

A shield 2 1/2 inches (6.35cm) in height, Sable a fess chequy Argent and Azure, all within a 1/8 inch (.32cm) green border.

Symbolism: Black is symbolic of the iron district of Pennsylvania; the band of white and blue squares is from the arms of William Pitt for whom Pittsburgh was named.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally authorized for the 99th Division on 21 May 1923. It was reassigned and authorized on 22 April 1968, for the 99th U. S. Army Reserve Command. On 16 April 1996, it was reassigned and authorized for the U.S. 99th Regional Support Command. It was amended to revise the description and add a symbolism on 6 December 1998. The insignia was redesignated for the U.S. Army 99th Regional Readiness Command effective 16 July 2003. It was redesignated effective 17 September 2008, for the 99th Regional Support Command.

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