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U.S. Army Sustainment


U.S. Army 103rd Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 103rd Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a gold heraldic millrind supporting a gold arrow, point up, and bearing upon its crossbar a blue fleur-de-lis between two blue five pointed stars; all upon a scarlet field and above a blue concave scroll, with ends white and folded vertically terminating at the outer edge of the crossbar, inscribed on the blue portion “WE SUCCEED” and on the white portion a cactus on the left side and a Yale key on the right, both vertical and gold.

Symbolism: Buff (gold) and scarlet are the colors associated with US Army Support units. The millrind is symbolic of strength and support; the stars denote military leadership and the arrow suggests combat readiness. The cactus refers to the unit’s early history as the Cactus Division and the key to its later redesignation to a Support Brigade. The fleur-de-lis and two stars represent World War II combat service in the Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe campaigns. The colors blue, white and scarlet also refer to the flag of Iowa, location of the unit’s headquarters.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 103d Support Command (Corps) on 10 August 1982. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2006, for the 103d Sustainment Command with the description updated.

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U.S. Army 103rd Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 103rd Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a yellow disc 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in diameter, a blue horizontal base, overall a green giant cactus, all with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) Army green border.

Symbolism: The cactus represents the home area of the unit in the Southwest when it was first organized and is symbolic of the unit’s nickname.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 103d Division on 14 October 1922 and the approval specified the segment at the bottom of the disc to be the color of the branch of service. On 18 June 1935, the authorization was amended to standardize the design with the segment at the bottom of the disc to be blue. It was redesignated for the 103d Command Headquarters (Divisional) on 23 October 1963. It was redesignated for the 103d Support Command on 29 March 1978. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 1993, for the 103d Infantry Division. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2006, for the 103d Sustainment Command and updated to add a symbolism.

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U.S. Army 135th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 135th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height consisting of a white background surmounted by a vertical silver arrow, point up and throughout the background, surmounted on the upper portion of the arrow’s shaft by a blue mill rind, all within a red scroll coming from behind the arrowhead and ending at a point, at the bottom, in front of the shaftment and inscribed “SUSTAINING FREEDOM” in silver.

Symbolism: The arrow represents military readiness. The mill rind, the heraldic symbol for the center of a millstone for grinding wheat, suggests support, the Command’s mission.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved effective 16 July 2007. The insignia was amended to correct the symbolism on 10 April 2007.

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U.S. Army 135th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 135th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

An embroidered shield edged with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) Red border blazoned as follows: Buff, a saltire Gules, bearing a mill rind Azure. Overall dimensions are 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in width and 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height.

Symbolism: Buff and red are the colors traditionally used by Sustainment units. The saltire, symbolic of the Saint Andrews Cross on the Alabama state flag, alludes to the unit’s home station. The mill rind, the heraldic symbol for the center of a millstone for grinding wheat, suggests support.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 July 2007.

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U.S. Army 13th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 13th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel insignia 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a blue star of thirteen points, one point up, bearing a gold saltire between three smaller gold saltires, all above a gold scroll, the middle section surmounting the star, inscribed “SERVICE TO THE SOLDIER” in red letters.

Symbolism: The star of thirteen points refers to the unit’s numerical designation. The central saltire stands for the command and the three smaller saltires for the Corps which it supports. The colors gold (for buff), red and blue are used in the flags of combat service support units. They refer to the supply and service, maintenance, transportation and other support functions of the command.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 13th Support Brigade on 25 August 1966. It was redesignated for the 13th Corps Support Command and amended to revise the symbolism effective 21 June 1975. The insignia was redesignated for the 13th Support Command on 17 October 1980. It was redesignated for the 13th Corps Support Command on 10 August 1989. The insignia was redesignated for the 13th Sustainment Command on 7 March 2006.

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U.S. Army 13th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 13th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a yellow octagon with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) blue border 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in height overall, a scarlet saltire throughout surmounted by a blue star of thirteen points fimbriated in yellow.

Symbolism: The octagon reinforced by the saltire refers to the unit’s mission of supporting the combat, combat support and combat service support organizations of the Corps. The star symbolizes the many far reaching missions of the command, and having thirteen points, the star also alludes to its numerical designation. The octagon is a symbol of regeneration; it alludes to the combat service support functions of the unit as consistently renewing the strength and vigor of the Corps.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 13th Support Brigade on 11 August 1966. It was redesignated for the 13th Corps Support Command and amended to revise the symbolism effective 21 June 1975. The insignia was redesignated for the 13th Support Command on 17 October 1980. It was redesignated for the 13th Corps Support Command on 10 August 1989. The insignia was redesignated for the 13th Sustainment Command on 7 March 2006.

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U.S. Army 143rd Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 143rd Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of an upright winged gold arrow with wings down, surmounted by a brick red annulet inscribed in the upper arc, "MOVEMENT" and on the lower "BRINGS VICTORY" in gold letters, the area within the annulet green.

Symbolism: Brick red and golden yellow (gold) are the colors used for Transportation, the previous designation of the unit and green is basic for "all traffic forward." The annulet simulates both a wheel, alluding to motor transport, and an enclosure, symbolizing a terminal. The arrow, a sign of direction, denotes controlled determination, and is used to represent the implements and armaments of warfare, while the wings relate to the unit's air transport aspects and symbolizes the speed in the organization's operations.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 143d Transportation Brigade on 13 January 1969. It was redesignated for the 143d Transportation Command on 16 October 1985 and amended to revise the description. The insignia was redesignated effective 17 September 2007, for the 143d Sustainment Command with the description and symbolism updated.

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U.S. Army 143rd Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 143rd Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a brick red upright rectangle with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) brick red border 3 inches (7.62cm) in height and 2 inches (5.08cm) in width overall, two golden yellow ribbands lined white with an arrowhead at each end interlaced and reversed at a 90 degree angle, fimbriated brick red.

Symbolism: Brick red and golden yellow are the colors used for Transportation units, the previous designation of the unit. The interlacing represents a strong support and simulates roads and viaducts, suggesting travel. The arrowheads denote leadership and a determined direction.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved 24 October 1968 for the 143d Transportation Brigade. It was redesignated for the 143d Transportation Command on 16 October 1985, and amended to revise the description and symbolism. The insignia was redesignated effective 17 September 2007, for the 143d Sustainment Command with the description and symbolism updated.

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U.S. Army 167th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 167th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a red heraldic mountain surmounted by two Philippine Island white bladed machetes saltirewise with gold grips in base enclosing a blue arrowhead bearing a seven-pointed white star all between two wavy blue bars and all above a red scroll inscribed “THEY RELY ON US” in gold letters.

Symbolism: Scarlet and buff (gold) are the colors used for Support units, and scarlet and white are the colors of the Alabama State flag. The colors blue and white refer to the origin of the unit as Infantry while the heraldic red mountain, suggested by “Red Mountain” in Birmingham denotes the homesite of the organization. The seven-pointed white star, taken from the flag of Australia, refers to the Australian administered island of New Guinea and the arrowhead denotes the unit’s assault landing there during World War II. The Philippine machetes symbolize the Southern Philippine Campaign and the colors blue, white and red together represent the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation awarded the unit.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 167th Support Brigade on 12 June 1970. It was redesignated for the 167th Support Command on 4 August 1976. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 2006, for the 167th Sustainment Command with the description updated.

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U.S. Army 167th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 167th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

A rectangle with long axis vertical and arched at each end, 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height and 2 inches (5.08 cm) in width, and having within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) yellow border a field divided equally with scarlet above white; on the scarlet half two crossed swords with white blades and yellow hilts and on the white half a red saltire.

Symbolism: The red crossbars in the lower section suggest the unit’s basic mission of support to combat units, represented by the crossed swords in the red field above. The red saltire also refers to the State of Alabama, the unit’s home state.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 167th Support Brigade on 15 July 1969. It was redesignated for the 167th Support Command on 4 August 1976. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 2006, for the 167th Sustainment Command with the description updated.

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U.S. Army 19th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 19th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting of two blue stars joined at the horizontal arms within a gold arch at the top composed of a keystone between four staggered wedge shapes on each side, the keystone bearing a red stylized Rose of Sharon, and upon a red scroll encircling the sides and base of the device the inscription “MISSION FLEXIBILITY” in gold letters.

Symbolism: Gold, suggestive of buff, and red are colors used for Support. The keystone and arch from the Independence Gate, Seoul, Korea, signify the unit’s activation and service in Korea. The Rose of Sharon is the flower of Korea. The single flower and the nine segments of the arch allude to the numerical designation of the organization. The two stars are symbolic of guidance and enterprise, and are dark blue, the National color of the United States. The stars also refer to the command and control of all assigned and attached units; to the planning and directing the provision of specified combat services support; to the coordinated planning and supervision of physical security and rear area protection activities when employed in the Army service area; and to the providing of staff advice and planning assistance to supported tactical command and combat service support activities.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally authorized for the 19th General Support Group on 23 July 1969 and redesignated for the 19th Support Brigade on 19 December 1974. On 7 September 1976, it was amended to revise the symbolism. The insignia was redesignated for the 19th Support Command on 14 April 1978. It was redesignated with description updated for the 19th Sustainment Command on 1 June 2006.

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U.S. Army 19th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 19th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

A cinquefoil 2 1/2 inches (6.35cm) in diameter overall with one lobe at top center, having a 1/8 inch (.32cm) yellow border and divided horizontally into two sections by a yellow S-shape line with red above and blue below.

Symbolism: The five-lobed form is an allusion to the Rose of Sharon, national flower of the Republic of South Korea, where the organization has served continuously since activation. The colors red and blue, separated by the S-shaped line, are references to the yin yang symbol found on the South Korean flag. The unit’s branch and numerical designation are further suggested by the S-shape, S being the 19th letter of the alphabet and initial letter of the word “Support.”

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 19th Support Brigade on 21 August 1975. It was redesignated for the 19th Support Command on 14 April 1978 and amended to revise the symbolism. The insignia was redesignated with description updated for the 19th Sustainment Command on 1 June 2006.

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U.S. Army 1st Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 1st Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height overall consisting of a silver arrow issuing in pale charged with a blue mullet of seven points surmounted by a plate, all within a red scroll inscribed in base “FIRST” in silver letters.

Symbolism: The arrow alludes to speed and effectiveness in fulfilling the mission of the organization. It also represents combat capability. The seven-pointed mullet is indicative of the seven continents of the world and refers to the ability of the Command to serve in all areas.

The insignia was originally approved for the 1st Logistical Command on 19 April 1968. It was redesignated for the Headquarters and Headquarters Company and Special Troops, 1st Field Army Support Command and amended to change the symbolism of the design on 18 February 1971. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Field Army Support Command on 4 June 1971. On 8 September 1972, it was redesignated for the 1st Corps Support Command. The insignia was approved for the 1st Support Command on 22 October 1980. It was redesignated for the 1st Sustainment Command with the description updated on 6 April 2006.

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U.S. Army 1st Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 1st Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a disc 2 inches (5.08 cm) in diameter overall, between a blue center and a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border, a 9/32 inch (.71 cm) white band. Issuing from the white band on a 45° diagonal from lower right to upper left, a white arrow, the arrowhead terminating above the center of the blue disc.

The insignia was originally approved for the 1st Logistical Command on 15 May 1952. It was amended to change the description on 23 January 1968. On 18 February 1971, the insignia was redesignated for the Headquarters and Headquarters Company and Special Troops, 1st Field Army Support Command. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Field Army Support Command on 4 June 1971. It was redesignated for the 1st Corps Support Command on 8 September 1972. It was redesignated for the 1st Support Command on 22 October 1980. The insignia was redesignated for the 1st Sustainment Command with the description updated on 6 April 2006.

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U.S. Army 21st Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 21st Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height and 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in width overall consisting of a white rectangular device, with the longer sides vertical and the top and bottom convex, bearing a blue horizontal band and overall throughout a representation of a gold arrow charged with a blue double hook (wolf-trap); all above a gold scroll inscribed “FIRST IN SUPPORT” in blue letters.

Symbolism: The blue band is symbolic of the Rhine River Valley, the first geographical support area of the organization. The broad golden arrow depicts the unit’s mission awareness and its logistical strength. The charging of the arrow with double hook, the symbol for a wolf-trap, from the arms of the city of Mannheim, alludes to the birthplace and headquarters of the organization. The scroll bears the unit’s motto and purpose: “First In Support.”

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 1st Support Brigade on 11 April 1966. It was redesignated for the 21st Support Command on 15 October 1976. The insignia was redesignated retroactive to 16 July 2007, for the 21st Sustainment Command with the description updated.

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U.S. Army 21st Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 21st Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a yellow shield with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) blue border, 2 9/16 inches (6.51 cm) in height and 2 inches (5.08 cm) in width overall, a blue millrind throughout.

Symbolism: The millrind is the iron reinforcement fixed in the center of a millstone to support the stone as it revolves on its axle when grinding wheat. It is used in heraldry as a symbol of support. With the additional reference to wheat, the “staff of life,” the millrind stands for the vital and varied support furnished by the organization.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 1st Support Brigade on 11 February 1966. It was redesignated for the 21st Support Command on 15 October 1976. The insignia was amended to provide an addendum to be worn with a tab inscribed “AMF (L)” immediately above it by personnel of Headquarters Company, Allied Command, Europe Mobile Force (Land Component) on 17 February 1984. It was redesignated retroactive to 16 July 2007, for the 21st Sustainment Command with the description updated and amended to delete the authorization to wear the “AMF (L) tab.

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U.S. Army 310th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 310th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a background saltirewise blue and scarlet bearing at the center a gray confederate cavalry hat with a black band and plume on a white saltire with lower ends passing under and upper ends extending slightly beyond a gold, all enclosing, triple folded scroll inscribed “VICTORY THROUGH SUPPORT” in black letters.

Symbolism: The plumed gray confederate cavalry hat alludes to Colonel Mosby, CSA and his Rangers after whom the John Singleton Mosby USAR Center in Alexandria, Virginia, was named and where the unit was formerly located. The saltire is a symbol of support; the saltire also appeared on the Confederate Battle Flag and in this instance refers to Virginia, the area in which Mosby and his Rangers operated. Blue, red, and white are the National colors.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 310th Field Army Support Command on 8 May 1973. It was redesignated for the 310th Support Command (Theater Army Area) on 10 May 1982. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 2007, for the 310th Sustainment Command with description and symbolism updated.

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U.S. Army 310th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 310th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a blue disc edged with a 1/16 inch (.16 cm) white border with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border, 2 inches (5.08 cm) in diameter overall, four white chains saltirewise throughout linked to a central white ring.

Symbolism: The four chains linked to the central ring symbolize the control and dispatching of supplies to various areas of operations.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 310th Logistical Command on 26 January 1956. It was redesignated for the 310th Field Army Support Command on 23 August 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the 310th Support Command (Theater Army Area) on 10 May 1982. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2007, for the 310th Sustainment Command with description updated.

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U.S. Army 311th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 311th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height consisting of a pair of gold wings opened and inverted and in front of them placed horizontally with bow at the right a scarlet key its shaft crossed at center by a vertical buff-colored double open-end wrench each end containing a gold hex nut with red center the upper and smaller and between the pinions of the wings, the lower end below the apex of a scarlet chevron and between the ends of a three sectioned gold scroll, two sections curving inward from either side the third section curving across bottom and bearing the words “PROVIDE” at left, “SUSTAIN” at bottom and “MAINTAIN” on the right in blue letters.

Symbolism: Buff and scarlet are the colors used by Support units. The organization’s mission is expressed briefly in the words of the motto, “PROVIDE, SUSTAIN, MAINTAIN.” The key, a traditional quartermaster symbol, refers to the word PROVIDE; the word SUSTAIN is represented by the chevron or rooftree, a symbol of support and the wrench is for maintenance, alluding to the last word of the motto. The wings in the background refer to the city of Los Angeles (The Angels) where the unit headquarters is located.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 311th Support Brigade on 4 November 1970. It was redesignated for the 311th Support Command (Corps) on 15 January 1980. The insignia was redesignated for the 311th Sustainment Command with the description updated on 13 October 2006.

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U.S. Army 311th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 311th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a blue disc edged with a 1/16 inch (.16 cm) white border with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border, 2 inches (5.08 cm) in diameter overall, three revolving and overlapping white arrows.

Symbolism: The three arrows, interwoven and moving in accord around a vital area, represent the elements and functions of the organization, that of transport, quartering, and supply of troops.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 311th Logistical Command on 22 March 1955. It was redesignated for the 311th Support Brigade on 21 March 1968. The insignia was redesignated for the 311th Support Command (Corps) on 15 January 1980. It was redesignated for the 311th Sustainment Command with the description updated on 13 October 2006.

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U.S. Army 316th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 316th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

An oval-shaped silver metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in width consisting of a buff background surmounted by a silver inverted triangle, overall and throughout a blue wavy reversed pall (Y), between the radian of the reversed pall, a red compass rose; all enclosed below by a green laurel wreath and above by a red scroll parted in three places inscribed “SUSTAIN THE VICTORY” in silver.

Symbolism: Buff is the color traditionally used by Sustainment units. The triangle denotes solidity and support, also referring to the Pittsburgh Tri-state area. The blue wavy reversed pall signifies the flowing together of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers to form the Ohio River at Pittsburgh, the location of the unit. The compass rose alludes to the Command’s ability to move, quarter and provide for forces worldwide, at any time. The laurel wreath symbolizes victory.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved fort he 316th Sustainment Command on 11 January 2007.

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U.S. Army 316th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 316th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white disc within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border, 2 inches (5.08 cm) in diameter overall, a representation of a compass rose, the four cardinal points and center blue and the secondary points red, bearing on the center a white fleur-de-lis.

Symbolism: The compass rose alludes to the ability of the Command to move, quarter, and provision forces at any point of the compass. The fleur-de-lis which traditionally is used at the north point of the compass, also represents the iris, the State flower of Tennessee, the birthplace of the unit.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 316th Logistical Command on 26 October 1954. It was redesignated for the 316th Sustainment Command with the description and symbolism updated on 13 November 2006.

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U.S. Army 364th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 364th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a buff masoned background bearing a white scroll charged with three horizontal rows of black cipher squares arranged three then six and four squares in base, all between a scarlet scroll folded near each end and inscribed at the top “WE LIVE TO SUPPORT” in gold letters, surmounted overall in base and above the bottom row on the scroll a blue chevron.

Symbolism: The masoned wall represents the location of the original unit, Fort Totten named in honor of Brigadier General Joseph Gilbert Totten, a former Chief Engineer of the Army. The black cipher squares on the white scroll allude to one of the missions of the unit to offer cryptologistic services. The arrangement of the cipher squares, three, six, four symbolizes the numerical designation of the unit. The blue chevron, the color suggested by the background of the State Flag of New York, symbolizes the former Group’s authority to provide command and control. Buff and scarlet are colors used by Support units.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 364th General Support Group on 20 January 1971. It was redesignated for the 364th Support Group on 15 June 1972. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 2009, for the 364th Sustainment Command and amended to update the description and revise the symbolism.

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U.S. Army 364th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 364th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a blue heptagon shaped embroidered item, a soldier red disc centrally placed and displaying a white triquetra, the disc emitting four white arrows toward each directional point (North, South, East, and West); all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border. The overall dimension is 2 3/4 inches (6.99 cm) in diameter.

Symbolism: Red, white, and blue are the nation’s colors. The heptagon signifies the seven Army values: loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity, and personal courage. Blue suggests the expeditionary nature of the unit, representing the waters of Puget Sound, located in Washington State, where the Command activated. The soldier red disc with the blue background alludes to the unit’s Logistical mission of continual worldwide support. The triquetra, Latin for “three cornered” indicates the three primary branches of logistics - Transportation, Ordnance, and Quartermaster - which closely coordinated, will sustain the fight to the end. The arrows denote the Command’s four functional areas of expertise: Transportation, Maintenance and Munitions, Supply and Services, and Petroleum and Water.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 16 September 2009. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-993)

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U.S. Army 377th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 377th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a gold star of seven points charged with a red star of seven points, superimposed on a red “Y” frame fastened with three gold rivets to and encircled by a continuous blue scroll flattened at top and bearing the inscription in gold letters “CAN DO” between the forks of the “Y” frame and “ANYTIME ANYWHERE” in base, the stem of the “Y” frame separating the two words.

Symbolism: The “Y” frame or brace is used to refer to the organization’s basic mission of support, and is also a symbol of coordinated strength equally distributed. The two seven pointed stars allude to the COSTAR nature and function of the unit.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 377th Support Brigade on 23 February 1967. It was redesignated for the 377th Corps Support Command on 19 October 1979. It was redesignated for the 377th Support Command (Theater Army Area) effective 16 July 1981. The insignia was redesignated with the description updated for the 377th Support Command on 19 October 2000. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2007, for the 377th Sustainment Command.

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U.S. Army 377th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 377th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a shield 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in width and 3 inches (7.62 cm) in height overall within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border a yellow field charged with two blue arrowheads above the apexes of two red interlaced chevrons.

Symbolism: The supply and services and maintenance elements of the organization are represented by the two red chevrons and the arrowheads refer to the combat units which the organization supports.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 377th Support Brigade on 11 May 1966. It was redesignated for the 377th Corps Support Command on 19 October 1979. It was redesignated for the 377th Support Command (Theater Army Area) effective 16 July 1981. The insignia was redesignated with the description updated for the 377th Support Command on 19 October 2000. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2007, for the 377th Sustainment Command.

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U.S. Army 3rd Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 3rd Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a gold octagon shape bearing three chevronels interlaced, the first scarlet, the second white, and the third blue, supporting at the top a Korean Taeguk (scarlet and blue) all within a scarlet border, at base a gold scroll inscribed “SUSTAINING THE LINE” in blue letters.

Symbolism: The Korean Taeguk within the octagon shape represents the unit’s eight campaigns in the Korean War. The red, white and blue interlaced chevronels symbolize the strong support offered by the Command; three chevronels further distinguish the unit’s numerical designation. Buff (gold) and scarlet are colors used for Support units.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 3d Support Command on 21 March 1978. It was redesignated effective 16 September 2007, for the 3d Sustainment Command with the description and symbolism amended.

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U.S. Army 3rd Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 3rd Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white disc within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border, 2 inches (5.08 cm) in diameter overall, three blue arrowheads with points outward, arranged to form a triangle, one point up.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 3d Logistical Command on 20 May 1952. It was redesignated on 23 September 1974, for the 3d Support Command. The insignia was redesignated effective 16 September 2007, for the 3d Sustainment Command with the description updated. (TIOH Drawing Number A-1-30)

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U.S. Army 4th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 4th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height consisting of a gold torch enflamed red superimposed by two gold crossed scimitars, overall a square divided saltirewise with white at top and bottom and blue on either side and all enclosed by a blue tripartite scroll inscribed “LEADERS” on the left, “IN” at bottom and “LOGISTICS” on the right in gold.

Symbolism: Red, white, and blue are our national colors and reflect courage, integrity, and devotion to duty; gold is emblematic of honor and high achievement. The two scimitars commemorate the unit’s campaigns in the Defense of Saudi Arabia and the Liberation and Defense of Kuwait. The torch symbolizes leadership. The square suggests a shipping container alluding to the unit’s stock control and processing of Army materiel. Its four sections reflect the numerical designation of the Command, while the crossed division of the box underscores strength and cooperation.

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 4th Corps Materiel Management Center on 18 September 1997. It was redesignated for the 4th Support Center effective 1 October 2000. It was redesignated for the 4th Sustainment Command with the symbolism updated effective 16 October 2008.

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U.S. Army 4th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 4th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a blue disc with a 1/16 inch (.16 cm) white edging all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border, 2 inches (5.08 cm) overall in diameter, four white arrows issuing from the white edging, interlaced and forming an open square in the center.

Symbolism: The four arrows allude to the organization’s numerical designation and the readiness for service in “any corner of the globe.” Red, white, and blue are the national colors.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 4th Logistical Command on 4 August 1964. It was redesignated for the 4th Support Center effective 21 December 1975. It was redesignated for the 4th Materiel Management Center on 16 June 1989. The insignia was amended to correct the authorization for the 4th Materiel Management Center on 14 August 1989. It was redesignated for the 4th Support Center on 15 November 2000. The insignia was redesignated for the 4th Sustainment Command effective 16 October 2008.

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U.S. Army 8th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia U.S. Army 8th Sustainment Command, distinctive unit insignia

A gold color circular metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a red fer-de-moulin above an open wreath of palm fronds surmounted on the wreath by the hilt of a vertical sword, point up, positioned in the middle of the blade a blue eight-pointed star, all below an arched blue scroll inscribed “SUSTAIN THE FORCE” in gold.

Symbolism: The fer-de-moulin, the center of a millstone for grinding wheat, suggests support. The sword denotes force readiness. The combination of the two images reflects the motto “SUSTAIN THE FORCE”.” The blue star, symbolic of the Command, has eight points signifying the Command’s numerical designation. The palm fronds symbolize the Command’s location in the Pacific Theater.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 3 February 2006.

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U.S. Army 8th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Army 8th Sustainment Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white shield 2 inches (5.08 cm) in width and 2 3/4 inches (6.99 cm) in height overall with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) white border four red wedges pointing inward from each side and from top and bottom and centered thereon a large blue eight-pointed star.

Symbolism: The pattern of red and white is adapted from the Eighth Army shoulder sleeve insignia and the manner in which the wedges enclose the star is suggestive of the support mission. The blue star, symbolic of command, has eight points signifying the Command’s numerical designation.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the Eighth Field Army Support Command on 3 May 1968. It was redesignated for the 8th Sustainment Command on 6 December 2005.

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