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U.S. Unified Combatant Commands (UCC)


U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), distinctive unit insignia

A silver metal and enamel device 1 5/32 inches (2.94 cm) in height consisting of a blue oval-shaped shield coming to a point at the top and bottom bearing a green stylized landmass of Africa, all within a red diminished border, above and between two palm fronds crossed at base. Attached above the device a blue scroll inscribed “UNITED STATES AFRICA COMMAND” in silver.

Symbolism: Blue alludes to the commitment of unity and coordination of Africa’s allies to promote the United States Africa Command mission. The palm fronds indicate Africa’s hope to achieve harmony on the continent and to build a partnership throughout the world. Green denotes prosperity. Red stands for liberation. The stylized landmass of Africa symbolizes the continent’s fortitude and the Command’s area of operation.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 30 April 2008.

/ TIOH

U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), emblem (crest)
Vector image of U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), emblem (crest) / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), emblem (crest)

On a light blue oval edged white, two palm fronds Proper crossed at base supporting a red oval-shaped shield coming to a point at the top and bottom, surmounted by a blue shield edged white bearing the green landmasses of Africa, all within a blue oval designation band edged white, with the inscription ‘UNITED STATES AFRICA COMMAND’ around the top of designation band, in white and displaying in base four white stars.

Symbolism: Light blue denotes the Department of Defense and total military readiness. The palm fronds indicate Africa’s hope to achieve unity on the continent and to build a partnership throughout the world. The red oval shield suggests the capacity of the USAFRICOM’s involvement to enhance national security, to stop the growth of terrorism and to promote peace in Africa. Green denotes prosperity. The landmasses of Africa signify the Command’s potential challenges to strengthen democracy, economic growth and future for the people of Africa. The stars represent the grade of the military leadership of the unified command.

The emblem was approved by the USAFRICOM Commander on 1 November 2007. (TIOH Dwg. No. A-1-949)

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U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a light blue oval-shaped embroidered item, coming to a point at the top and bottom, two palm fronds crossed at base Proper, surmounted by a blue oval shield edged with a 1/16 inch red border bearing the green landmasses of Africa; all within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) black border. Overall dimensions are 3 1/8 inches (7.94 cm) in height and 2 7/16 inches (6.19 cm) in width.

Symbolism: Blue alludes to the commitment to the unity and coordination of Africa’s allies to promote the United States Africa Command mission. The palm fronds indicate Africa’s hope to achieve unity on the continent and to build a partnership throughout the world. Red stands for liberation. Green denotes prosperity. The landmasses of Africa symbolize the continent’s fortitude and the Command’s area of operation.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 26 November 2007.

/ TIOH

U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), distinctive unit insignia (emblem) U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), distinctive unit insignia (emblem)

A Gold color metal and enamel device, 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in diameter consisting of a Light Blue disc edged Scarlet bearing Golden Tan land masses including Northeast Africa and Southwest Asia all encircled by a Green designation band edged Black and inscribed with "UNITED STATES" above and "CENTRAL COMMAND" below in Gold letters; overall an eagle in flight in three-quarters profile facing sinister with a White head and tail, Black body, Golden Tan legs and beak, and Black, White and Brown wings, grasping in its talons a shield blazoned as follows: Gules, a paly of three Argent, on a chief Azure four mullets Or.

Symbolism: Red, green and black are the predominate colors in the national flags of the countries in United States Central Command's area of responsibility. The American bald eagle in flight symbolizes the Command's mobility and mission to support the security and stability of friendly countries and to protect the United States' interests. The eagle bears in its talons a shield in red, white and blue, representing power, vigilance and the constancy of the United States. Four stars, on a blue field lying horizontally across the top of the shield, symbolize the four star Commander in Chief of the United States Central Command, while the four vertical red stripes, separated by white stripes, represent the four military services that comprise the forces of the United States Central Command: the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 25 January 2002. The insignia was amended to correct the description on 29 January 2002.

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U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a gold shield with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) black border, 2 5/16 inches (5.87 cm) in width and 3 9/16 inches (9.05 cm) in height overall, a green palm frond entwined about a black sword with red grip.

Symbolism: Gold is emblematic of excellence; black suggests dependability and determination. The upraised sword and shield signify military preparedness and vigilance. The palm suggests the geographic theater of operations and symbolizes victory.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 22 February 1991.

/ TIOH

U.S. Cyber Command (CYBERCOM), emblem
Vector image of U.S. Cyber Command (CYBERCOM), emblem / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Cyber Command (CYBERCOM), emblem

U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height consisting of a gold polestar interlaced by four conjoined annulets - green, red, dark blue and blue - all surmounted by a black shield bordered gold and charged with a gold eagle's head. / TIOH


U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM), emblem
Vector image of U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM), emblem / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM), emblem

U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a white shield with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) gold border 3 1/2 inches (8.89cm) in height and 2 13/16 inches (7.14cm) in width, a medium blue land mass of the Continental United States bearing four gold stars crosswise shaded dark blue above in base four arced stripes in green, red, dark blue and blue.

Symbolism: The design is a duplicate of the United States Joint Forces Command's seal. / TIOH


U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height consisting of a blue shield bearing a green North American continent, superimposed by the eagle, breast shield, laurel and arrows derived from the arms of the United States all in proper colors and between the wing and arrows are three gold five pointed stars; all below five gold eight pointed stars.

Symbolism: The eagle, taken from the Great Seal, represents the United States. The landmass of North America highlights the scope of the Northern Command mission. The five stars refer to the armed forces, which coordinate all mission efforts to protect the country. The three stars on the continent represent the approximate locations of the terrorist attacks of September 11th in New York City, Pennsylvania and the Pentagon.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved effective 1 October 2002.

/ TIOH

U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), emblem
Vector image of U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), emblem / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), emblem

The emblem was approved by the NORTHCOM Commander in Chief on 23 August 2002.

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U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia

A blue shield with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) gold border, 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in width and 3 inches (7.32 cm) in height overall bearing a green North American continent superimposed by the eagle, breast shield, laurel and arrows derived from the arms of the United States in proper colors and between the wing and arrows are three gold five pointed stars; all below five gold eight pointed stars.

Symbolism: The eagle, taken from the Great Seal, represents the United States. The landmass of North America highlights the scope of the Northern Command mission. The five stars refer to the armed forces, which coordinate all mission efforts to protect the country. The three stars on the continent represent the approximate locations of the terrorist attacks of September 11th in New York City, Pennsylvania and the Pentagon.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved effective 1 October 2002.

/ TIOH

U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), emblem (seal)
Vector image of U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), emblem (seal) / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), emblem (seal)

U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM), shoulder sleeve insignia

A black shield with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border 2 1/4 inches (5.72 cm) in width and 3 inches (7.32 cm) in height overall bearing a light blue terrestrial globe showing the Pacific Ocean side with gold landmasses and gridlines superimposed by a green bayonet issuing from base with a gold blade and red lightning flash.

Symbolism: The terrestrial map of the Pacific area is the area of operation of the U.S. Pacific Command. The contrasting colors of gold and black refer to the night and day, around the clock mission of the U.S. Army Element of the Pacific Command. Red is the color of zeal and action. The bayonet represents the mission of responding to a crisis and deterring aggression. The bayonet overlapping the globe highlights the enhancement of security in this region of the world by this Command. The lightning flash reflects communications infrastructure and quickness of response.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved for wear by the U.S. Army Element of Headquarters, United States Pacific Command on 2 May 2002.

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U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height consisting of a rectangle radiused top and bottom with a gold sunburst on a dark blue disc at top charged with a scarlet escutcheon above a representation in blue on gold of the continent of South America and Central America above a demi-arc of nineteen gridlines on light blue and the designation "US SOUTHERN COMMAND" in dark blue letters below.

Symbolism: The sunburst denotes enlightened promotion of democratic institutions, cooperative efforts to oppose and overcome transnational threats to the region's stability and responsibility to protect its environment. The eleven points of the burst and nineteen radiating gridlines below represent the thirty countries, which comprise the area of responsibility, in the region of South and Central America and the Caribbean. The shield signifies protection of the United States civilians, interests and forces committed to the area, the prevention of terrorist activity and assistance in reducing illicit source zone activities. Blue represents worldwide capability, light blue indicates coastal security of the nations within the region. Scarlet denotes sacrifice and courage, gold symbolizes excellence.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 1 August 2003.

/ TIOH

U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), emblem
Vector image of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), emblem / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), emblem

The emblem was prepared and approved by the Commander, U.S. Southern Command on 18 Jun 1965.

/ TIOH

U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia

A rectangle 3 inches (7.32 cm) in height and 2 1/16 inches (5.24 cm) in width radiused at top and bottom with a gold (yellow) sunburst enflamed orange on an ultramarine blue disc and charged with a scarlet escutcheon above a chevron-shaped light blue field with nineteen gold lines radiating from the point of the chevron and bearing a representation in ultramarine blue of the continent of South America and Central America, all within a gold border.

Symbolism: The sunburst denotes enlightened promotion of democratic institutions, cooperative efforts to oppose and overcome transnational threats to the region's stability and responsibility to protect its environment. The eleven points of the burst and nineteen radiating gridlines below represent the countries, which comprise the area of responsibility, in the region of South and Central America and the Caribbean. The shield signifies protection of the United States civilians, interests and forces committed to the area, the prevention of terrorist activity and assistance in reducing illicit source zone activities. Blue represents worldwide capability, light blue indicates coastal security of the nations within the region. Scarlet denotes sacrifice and courage, gold symbolizes excellence. The color orange on the sunburst represents Central America, while the gold of the burst represents South America. The five main points and six flames of the burst along with nineteen radiating lines below represent the thirty countries, which make up the area of responsibility region. Ultramarine blue denotes worldwide capability, light blue signifies coastal security and protection. Gold symbolizes excellence.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 1 August 2003.

/ TIOH

U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height consisting of a black mailed fist detailed gold grasping a green branch of laurel and two diagonally crossed red lightning bolts all enclosed by a black scroll doubled and inscribed "DETER" at top and 'EMPLOY" at bottom in gold.

Symbolism: The mailed fist, lightning bolts and laurel are adapted from the seal of the joint U.S. Strategic Command and highlight the unit's association with that command. The motto reflects the unit's mission. Gold is for excellence and honor; black represents determination and solidity.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 12 Aug 1997.

/ TIOH

U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), emblem
Vector image of U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), emblem / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), emblem

The command emblem was approved 23 August 2002.

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U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a medium blue shield edged with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) black border 3 1/4 inches (8.26cm) in height and 2 1/2 inches (6.35cm) in width overall a black mailed fist detailed gold issuing from base and grasping a green branch of laurel and two diagonally crossed red lightning bolts.

Symbolism: Medium blue (DOD blue) is the color traditionally used by organizations associated with the Department of Defense. The mailed fist, lightning bolts and laurel are adapted from the seal of the joint U.S. Strategic Command and highlight the unit's association with that command.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 12 Aug 1997.

/ TIOH

U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM), distinctive unit insignia U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM), distinctive unit insignia

A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in diameter consisting of a gold sun in splendor issuing from a blue demi-globe gridlined yellow, overall a black spear superimposed by a stylized gold winged seahorse; all enclosed by a brick red scroll inscribed "SPEARHEAD OF DEPLOYMENT" in gold.

Symbolism: Brick red and golden yellow are the colors traditionally used by Transportation units. The sun and demi-globe allude to Illinois, the Prairie State, and the location of the organization. It also highlights the command's worldwide mission to provide air, land and sea transportation to the Department of Defense. The spear represents the military readiness and the command's leadership endeavor in wartime conflict and peacetime operations. The winged seahorse is adapted from the United States Transportation Command's badge.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 7 December 2001.

/ TIOH

U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM), emblem
Vector image of U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM), emblem / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM), emblem

The emblem was prepared and approved by the Commander in Chief, U.S. Transportation Command on 26 Jun 1987.

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U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM), shoulder sleeve insignia

On a brick red shield within a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) black border, 2 1/2 inches (6.35 cm) in width and 3 1/2 inches (8.89 cm) in height overall, a golden yellow sun in splendor issuing from a blue demi-globe gridlined golden yellow, overall a black spear superimposed by a stylized yellow winged seahorse.

Symbolism: Brick red and golden yellow are the colors traditionally used by Transportation units. The sun and demi-globe allude to Illinois, the Prairie State, and the location of the organization. It also highlights the command's worldwide mission to provide air, land and sea transportation to the Department of Defense. The spear represents the military readiness and the command's leadership endeavor in wartime conflict and peacetime operations. The winged seahorse is adapted from the United States Transportation Command's badge.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 7 December 2001.

/ TIOH

U.S. European Command, shoulder sleeve insignia
Vector image of U.S. European Command, shoulder sleeve insignia / Vector-Images.com
U.S. European Command, shoulder sleeve insignia

An arched shield 4 inches (10.16cm) in height by 3 inches (7.62cm) in width and blazoned: Azure, an eagle perched on a bundle of arrows fesswise, wings elevated Or between thirteen mullets three, five, and five argent; on a chief per fess Azure and Gules a fess Argent, all within a narrow border of the second.

Symbolism: The thirteen stars on the blue field are symbolic of liberation. The eagle forms the letter "V", representing victory and freedom. The red, white and blue triparted portion of the shield are our National colors.

The shoulder sleeve insignia was approved on 21 Mar 1945.

/ TIOH

U.S. Space Command (SPACECOM), obsolete emblem
Vector image of U.S. Space Command (SPACECOM), obsolete emblem / Vector-Images.com
U.S. Space Command (SPACECOM), obsolete emblem

The dark, blue disc encircled by a white band with narrow yellow borders inscribed "United States" at top and "Space Command" at bottom in dark blue letters, provides the background and symbolizes the space environment. The eagle and shield, a traditional symbol of American strength and vigilance, is positioned above a light blue elliptical globe with light land masses and dark blue grid lines to represent the expansion of this strength and vigilance into space. The globe, as viewed from space, symbolizes the earth as being the origin and control point for all space vehicles and represents the area of operations of the United States Space Command. Encompassing the elliptical globe are two yellow orbital paths crossed diagonally, each bearing a yellow polestar detailed light tan and signifying the worldwide coverage provided in accomplishing the surveillance, navigation and communications missions. The gold brown eagle, detailed in dark brown and highlighted in light tan, with a white head and tail; and yellow beak, eyes and talons detailed in light tan, is grasping in his right talon a green olive branch, detailed in dark green, and in his left talon 13 arrows with white arrowheads and feathers, and light tan shafts. The eagle is flanked by an arc of four yellow stars detailed in light tan, and symbolizing the fusion of the four armed services into a unified command.

The emblem was approved on 15 Aug 1985. In 2002, USSTRATCOM absorbed the United States Space Command (USSPACECOM).

/ TIOH

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